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We Cannot Have Reconciliation Without the Truth - Gracelyn Smallwood

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Uploaded on Feb 27, 2010

Ms Gracelyn Smallwood has been a tireless advocate for improved outcomes in Indigenous Health for over forty years. Since qualifying as a registered nurse - one of the few employment options open to Aboriginal women in Townsville in the early 1970s - Gracelyn has championed the improvement of health, in particular Indigenous Health and HIV- AIDS prevention and has gained national and international recognition in both mainstream and cultural public health spheres.

Gracelyn was awarded Queensland Aboriginal of the Year in 1986; an Order of Australia medal in 1992 for service to public health, particularly HIV-AIDS education; and in 1994 was the first woman, Indigenous person and non-paediatrician to receive the Henry Kemp Memorial Award at the International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect.

Gracelyn currently works at the largely Indigenous Cleveland Youth Detention Centre as nurse and mentor, and at Townsville Hospital as a nurse and midwife. She is an Associate Professor and Indigenous Advisor to the Vice-Chancellor at James Cook University and has been a driving person behind James Cook University's progressive Reconciliation Statement.

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