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Edmund Pettus Bridge [How Long, Not Long]

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Uploaded on Mar 10, 2008

Last year, Will King entered the studio with drummer/percussionist Aaron Comess [The Spin Doctors] to record Edmund Pettus Bridge [How Long, Not Long], a song derived from a recent Civil Rights quest which he took through the Deep South.

The journey took him from Atlanta to Montgomery to Selma to Birmingham as well as interesting points in-between. The song, which tells the story of "Bloody Sunday" and the plight leading to the passage of Voting Rights Act of 1965, will be used as a fundraiser for the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development Pathways to Freedom program.

If you would like to donate funds to support recording & distribution costs of the forthcoming CD, please email: wbradking [at] hotmail.com


As you listen to the song, please read along with the lyrics. AFTER listening, we encourage you to research each individual mentioned in this song as they played a crucial role in the freedoms we enjoy to this day.

Edmund Pettus Bridge [How Long, Not Long]
Words and Music by Will King. All Rights Reserved.
Will King-guitars/vocals; Aaron Comess--drums/percussion
Recorded at 20/20 Music--engineer--Saul Zonana

Fifty-four miles and forty-two years from Montgomery
Edmund Pettus Bridge still stands
What happened on that Bloody Sunday
Makes me question just who I am

I don't give an Alabama Goddamn
Until you accept me for who I am

Thousands of marching feet
Governor Wallace tells his smiling men "Go hit Selma's streets"
Billy clubbing and tear gassing their honest dreams
Spider Martin's lens fills with triumph and defeat

I don't give an Alabama Goddamn
Until you accept me for who I am

John Lewis, Hosea Williams would not accept defeat
A second and third march would happen within weeks
Not before Amelia Boyton Robinson and others were beat
Bloody Sunday washed through all of America's streets

JoAnne Bland's sister cried red blood tears
Mr. James Reeb beat in front of the Silver Moon Café
Two days later he died
Jimmie Lee Jackson, Jimmie Lee Jackson, Jimmie Lee Jackson was shot dead
For protecting his Ma; for protecting his Grandpa
They did not die in vain

I don't give an Alabama Goddamn
Until you accept me for who I am

Ralph Abernathy, Rosa Parks, Johnnie Carr and Dr. King
Joined together with so many others in this dream
Educate, vote protect your civil rights
Peaceful protest is the only plight

They marched four days from Selma To Montgomery's Capitol Hill
Stars for Freedom played
The nation was listening
The world woke up
President Johnson readied his legislative pen

Then Dr. King he stood up
Yes, Dr. King he stood up
Dr. King said:

How long, not long
How long, not long
How long, not long
Until we're free

How long, not long
How long, not long
How long, not long
Until we're free

How long, not long
How long, not long
How long, not long
Until we're free

Fifty-four miles and forty-two years from Montgomery

Edmund Pettus Bridge still stands

visit www.willkingmusic.com/pathwaystofreedom

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