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Britten - Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, Op. 31 [Part 2/2]

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Published on Nov 29, 2010

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)

Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, Op. 31:
Dirge 0:01
Hymn 3:26
Sonnet 5:28
Epilogue 10:10

Written in 1943.

Robert Tear, tenor
Alan Civil, horn
Neville Marriner, conductor
Northern Sinfonia Orchestra

Released in 1971.

ClassicalRecords is a Youtube channel where I upload some excellent performances from the LPs in my collection. I'm uploading these LPs because they are either not available on CD, out of print on CD, or just difficult to find.

Dirge
This ae nighte, this ae nighte,
Every nighte and alle,
Fire and fleet and candle‑lighte,
And Christe receive thy saule.
When thou from hence away art past,
Every nighte and alle,
To Whinny‑muir thou com'st at last;
And Christe receive thy saule.
If ever thou gavest hosen and shoon,
Every nighte and alle,
Sit thee down and put them on;
And Christe receive thy saule.
If hosen and shoon thou ne'er gav'st nane
Every nighte and alle,
The whinnes sall prick thee to the bare bane;
And Christe receive thy saule.
From Whinny‑muir when thou may'st pass,
Every nighte and alle,
To Brig o' Dread thou com'st at last;
And Christe receive thy saule.
From Brig o' Dread when thou may'st pass,
Every nighte and alle,
To Purgatory fire thou com'st at last;
And Christe receive thy saule.
If ever thou gavest meat or drink,
Every nighte and alle,
The fire sall never make thee shrink;
And Christe receive thy saule.
If meat or drink thou ne'er gav'st nane,
Every nighte and alle,
The fire will burn thee to the bare bane;
And Christe receive thy saule.
This ae nighte, this ae nighte,
Every nighte and alle,
Fire and fleet and candle‑lighte,
And Christe receive thy saule.
Lyke Wake Dirge, Anonymous (15th century)


Hymn
Queen and huntress, chaste and fair,
Now the sun is laid to sleep,
Seated in thy silver chair,
State in wonted manner keep:
Hesperus entreats thy light,
Goddess excellently bright.
Earth, let not thy envious shade
Dare itself to interpose;
Cynthia's shining orb was made
Heav'n to clear when day did close:
Bless us then with wishèd sight,
Goddess excellently bright.
Lay thy bow of pearl apart,
And thy crystal shining quiver;
Give unto the flying hart
Space to breathe, how short so-ever:
Thou that mak'st a day of night,
Goddess excellently bright.
Ben Jonson (1572-1637)


Sonnet
O soft embalmer of the still midnight,
Shutting, with careful fingers and benign,
Our gloom‑pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light,
Enshaded in forgetfulness divine:
O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close,
In midst of this thine hymn my willing eyes.
Or wait the "Amen" ere thy poppy throws
Around my bed its lulling charities.
Then save me, or the passèd day will shine
Upon my pillow, breeding many woes,
Save me from curious conscience, that still lords
Its strength for darkness, burrowing like a mole;
Turn the key deftly in the oilèd wards,
And seal the hushèd casket of my Soul.
John Keats (1795-1821)

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    • "Serenade for tenor, horn and strings Op. 31 (1971 Remastered Version): 5. Hymn: Queen and huntress (Ben Jonson)" by Robert Tear/Alan Civil/Northern Sinfonia Orchestra/Sir Neville Marriner Listen ad-free with YouTube Red

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