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DailyBuzz Interview with Dr. Sanjay Reddy

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Published on Mar 27, 2014

• What's the purpose of Stop Colon Cancer Now?
• What is National Colon Cancer Screening Day and why is it held?
• How does family history relate to colon cancer risk?
• What do basketball and March Gladness have to do with colon cancer screening?
• What are the ways to screen for colon cancer?
• If something is found during a colonoscopy, what happens?
• What is the risk of developing colon cancer?
• When should a person get screened?
• How often does a person need a colonoscopy?
• What are the symptoms of colon cancer?
• Tell us about how common colon cancer is and how it can be prevented?
• Where can I go for more information and to schedule a colonoscopy?

Here is the message:
• Colon cancer screening saves lives
• Colonoscopy is the most effective method of screening for colon cancer
• Colonoscopy is the only procedure that can identify and remove problem areas at the same time
• National Screening Day is March 7
• StopColonCancerNow.com wants 2014 first-time patients to participate in their first screening on March 7 and to raise awareness about the importance of family history in colon cancer risk
• Visit StopColonCancerNow.com for more information

What you need to know:
National Colon Cancer Screening Day is Friday, March 7.
• The goal is to encourage at least 2,014 first-time patients to participate in their first screening on March 7 and to raise awareness about the importance of family history in colon cancer risk.
• Our community of more than 1,000 physicians hopes National Colon Cancer Screening Day will help StopColonCancerNow.com lead the way in colon cancer prevention.
• Our theme is once again March Gladness to serve as a reminder that preventing colon cancer with a colonoscopy is a slam dunk.
• With March being both the pinnacle of the college basketball season as well as Colon Cancer Awareness Month, we hope to encourage people to rally around their health and their family's health as they would rally around their favorite team.

Family history matters.
• Individuals with one first-degree relative who has colon cancer have two to three times the risk of developing the disease.
• A recent study published in the journal Cancer found that individuals with relatives with precancerous polyps are also at increased risk of developing cancer and need to be screened 10 years prior to the youngest case.
• Individuals with a family history of colon cancer or polyps may also need to be screened more frequently than the recommended 10 year interval.
• A conversation with family members about their colonoscopy history is one of the best ways to determine whether screening needs to happen before age 50.

Colon cancer screening saves lives.
• The lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is one in 20 (Source - American Cancer Society).
• African American individuals who are 45 years of age or older are at higher risk and should be screened.
• Those of other races who are 50 years of age or older should be screened.
• Colon cancer is the third deadliest form of cancer (when men and women are considered separately), yet when caught early colon cancer patients have a 90 percent chance of survival.

Colonoscopy is the most effective method of screening for colon cancer.
• Colonoscopy is the only test that allows both detection and prevention at the same time.
• A multi-decade study recently confirmed that removal of polyps during colonoscopy reduces risk of death from colorectal cancer by more than 50 percent. (Source -- New England Journal of Medicine)

Find out more at www.stopcoloncancernow.com!

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