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Willie Colon y Hector Lavoe - Barruto - Music Video

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Published on Sep 24, 2012

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976,
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This video is fair use under U.S. copyright law because it is (1) noncommercial (2) transformative in nature, and (3) does not compete with the original work or have
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This a another homage to SALSA..Willie Colon, Hector Lavoe
and FILM NOIR....Plus the audio your about to hear is in mono.
Which allows you to heare the richness of the entire band sound.
Now some credits:
William Anthony Colón (born 28 April 1950) is a Nuyorican salsa musician.
Primarily a trombonist, Colón also sings, writes, produces and acts.
He is also involved in municipal politics in New York City.
Already one of the most feared young talents on the salsa scene,
Willie Colón and his partner in crime Héctor Lavoe showcased not only
confidence
that invoked a senbut a surprising flexibility and independence on 1970s
La Gran Fuga (The Big Break). Case in point was the first song, "Ghana'e,"
based on an African children's song and given a vocal reading (by both Lavoe
and the band chorus) se of joy and wonder quite at odds with the cutthroat
world of New York salsa. Throughout the album, Colón's septet was tight as
usual (they had freed themselves completely from their Latin soul and novelty past)
but they performed songs at many different paces
and left plenty of space in their sound -- yet still never sacrificed the power
of Colón and Willie Campbell's dual-trombone lineup.
The son montuno "Pa' Colombia"
or the powerful "Barrunto" were the clearest hits to those who were already Colón
fans, but the rest of the material stretched Colón's résumé, including the melancholy
"No Cambiaré," an affectionate look at the power of grandmothers (and mothers)
in "Abuelita," and salutes to Puerto Rico, Colombia, Brazil, and Mexico as well
as the Estados Unidos.
Beyond the trombone, he has also worked as a composer, arranger, and singer,
and eventually as a producer and director. Combining elements of jazz, rock,
and salsa, his work incorporates the rhythms of traditional music from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Brazil, and "that 'other' ancestral homeland, Africa", representing the mostly
one-way flow from Puerto Rico to the New York-based diaspora.[6] "His life and
music commute back and forth between his home turf in the Bronx and his
ancestral Puerto Rico, with more than casual stop-offs in other musical zones
of the Caribbean."[6] Colón "makes the relation between diaspora and Caribbean
homeland the central theme of his work," particularly in his 1971 Christmas
album, Asalto navideño.[6] The lyrics and music of the songs on this album
"enact the diaspora addressing the island culture in a complex, loving but at
the same time mildly challenging way
1. Ghana' E
2. Pa' Colombia
3. No Cambiaré
4. Sigue Felíz
5. Barrunto
6. Abuelita
7. Panameña
8. Canción Para Mi Suegra

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