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Battery Hens

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Published on Feb 4, 2012

I downloaded the video from a website and have permission to upload onto youtube. Even though this is in Australia, this is what happens in the UK as well.

The birds who lay our caged eggs will never feel the sun on their feathers, beat their wings, or experience the life that nature intended them to. Instead, each hen is imprisoned in a wire cage with up to four other birds. Her 'living' space is smaller than one A4 sheet of paper—not even enough space to stretch her wings.
Although she is known to be smart and social, to the egg industry she is just another production unit. In Australia, a 'Code of Practice' protects battery hen operators from being prosecuted for cruelty.

From Shell to Hell-
Over 12 million of day-old male chicks (an unwanted 'by-product' of all egg production systems) are gassed or ground up alive each year, while female chicks will often have the tips of their beaks painfully sliced through with a hot iron in a process called 'debeaking'.

Caged Cruelty-
Cages in today's battery farms are typically stacked in tiers to maximise the number of birds who can be crammed into one shed.
In these barren enclosures, hens are denied the freedom to express important natural behaviours such as being able to stand on a perch to keep their legs strong; dust bathe to keep their feathers clean and free from parasites; and the strong urge to lay their eggs in a secluded nest.
Hens can also suffer severe 'defeathering' from rubbing painfully against their wire enclosures. Their feet can become entangled in the wire that they are forced to unnaturally stand on 24 hours a day, while weaker birds may die unnoticed in their cages, trampled by cagemates.
To compound their misery, lack of exercise causes hens' bones to become weak, brittle and break easily. Studies have shown that 1 in 6 hens inside battery cages live with broken bones1.

'Spent Hens' -
There is no happy retirement for a battery hen. Birds are killed when their egg laying rate declines at around 18 months of age (of a natural lifespan of about 12 years). These so-called 'spent hens' are forcefully pulled from their cages and stuffed into crates to be sent to the slaughterhouse. During this process, another third of hens sustain newly broken bones due to rough handling. The terrifying last moments of a battery hen are then spent hanging by her legs on a slaughter chain.

I downloaded the video from a website and have permission to upload onto youtube. Even though this is in Australia, this is what happens in the UK as well.

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