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Best Flat Iron Steak Ever

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Uploaded on Apr 19, 2010

http://www.RDFoods1.com

Taste the steak that has everyone talking. The Flat Iron Steak's popularity is catching on with steak lovers everywhere. Second to only the filet mignon in tenderness, flat iron steaks are well marbled, juicy, big on flavor and economical. This trendy steak will put a smile on your family as well as your wallet!

Flat iron steak is the American name for the cut known as Butlers' steak in the UK and oyster blade steak in Australia and New Zealand. This cut of steak is from the shoulder of a beef animal. The steak encompasses the teres minor and infraspinatus muscles of beef, and one may see this displayed in some butcher shops and meat markets as a "top blade" roast. Steaks that are cross cut from this muscle are called top blade steaks or patio steaks. As a whole cut of meat, it usually weighs around 2 to 3 lbs, is located adjacent to the heart of the shoulder clod, under the seven or paddle bone, which is analogous to the shoulder blade in a human. The entire top blade usually yields 4 steaks, between 8 to 12oz. each. Flat iron steaks usually have a significant amount of marbling. Anatomically, the muscle forms the dorsal part of the rotator cuff of the steer. This cut is anatomically distinct from the shoulder tender which lies directly below it and which is analogous to the teres major in a human.

Restaurants, particularly upscale, have recently begun serving flat iron steaks on their menus. Especially popular are flat irons from Wagyu beef, as a way for chefs to offer more affordable and profitable dishes featuring Wagyu or Kobe beef. To make it more marketable, the steak, which has the fascia separating the infraspinatus and teres minor within it, has, in recent years, been cut as two flatter steaks, each corresponding to one muscle, with the tough fascia removed.

In the North American Meat Processor (NAMP) meat buyers guide, it is item #1114D Beef Shoulder, Top Blade Steak. The NAMP lists it as the second most tender cut, after the Tenderloin, and followed (in order) by the Top Sirloin Center-Cut, the Ribeye and Strip Steak Center-Cut, and finally Beef Shoulder, Arm. disclaimer: compensated affiliate

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