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Homebuilt DIY Flying Saucer (Sport Model) Biplane Concept

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Published on Nov 16, 2008

Credits:
Uncropped thumbnail image
http://www.extremetech.com/wp-content...

This recently declassified 1950's Air Force design contains an artist conception (now used for the video thumbnail image) that is remarkably similar to this concept sketch, but I had uploaded this video back in 2008, 4 years before this article came out. How could I have known?
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/13...

The CG is all is wrong for a glider on this type of craft so it WILL dive at the ground when power fails. Lots of model building and testing may fix that, however. It takes massive power to reach supersonic speeds, but my goal was to make something lighter and slower, so that somebody without a NASA budget might afford one. If made light enough it might function similar to a glider in that you could ride thermals in-place, or make tight circles indefinitely, looking like you were hovering maybe, but using the power of nature.

Let me know if you are serious about contributing towards development. Not encouraging anyone to build it in its current form, but if you do you are on your own. Things that might most likely change as a result of real world testing: the size and position of control surfaces, air slots, size and number of fans (two for redundancy, but is one enough?), fan nozzles (coanda effect requires that air impact the surface of the wing at a much steeper angle than this), RPM, cable stays. There is some talk about replacing the expensive, heavy and complicated conventional flaps with a series of dynamic openings (simple slits held open by control strings) in the fabric near the outside edge. Control mechanism, inflatable landing pads and drive train not shown.

I know what this looks like but it's not a UFO. It is not meant for space travel. It's my own concept sketch for a one person ultralight biplane. Like a normal biplane, it will have two wings, an upper wing and a lower wing. They just happen to be circular. As in a real airplane, lift is produced by directing air over the top surface of the wings (maintaining I would guess somewhat more than a 20 miles per hour minimum stall speed...) using the Coanda Effect, only in this case, air flow is provided by two counter-rotating centrifugal fans (and nozzles, not shown). The design is extremely light owing to its cable and aluminum tubing framework. The fans do not support weight so they can be built very light using bicycle bearings. The pilot sits on a platform (not shown) above the lower fan. They see a panoramic view around them because the wings are partially transparent, made out of reflective plastic. You can see out but they can't see in. The craft is kept inflated by air pressure provided by the lower fan. Air escapes through a slot around the outside edge, where control is provided by a series of flaps (or vents) hooked up to a joystick controller. Like a helicopter, it hovers but you can tilt the craft in the direction you want to go. I don't expect it to go very fast. To steer (yaw, change compass direction) right and left, simply speed up one fan while slowing down the other one. Plans will be made available at a later date so stay tuned, however, I must hastily add that this is only a concept sketch. I do not know if it will fly. It has not been tested and I will not be responsible for damages!

This video is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license. In short: you are free to share and make derivatives of this work under the conditions that you appropriately attribute it. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder.

This video may contain parts or visuals of a free software program. You may use it freely according to its particular license:
Blender (http://www.blender.org) is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. This work is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.

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