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Bergen County, New Jersey: "County on the Move" 1957 Board of Chosen Freeholders

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Published on Mar 2, 2014

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'"The spectacular post-war growth of Bergen County and its impact on government."
Great suburban footage.'

Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergen_C...

Bergen County is the most populous county of the state of New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, its population was 905,116, an increase of 20,998 (2.4%) from the 884,118 enumerated in the 2000 Census, Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey, Bergen County is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area and is situated directly across the George Washington Bridge from Manhattan. Its county seat is Hackensack, also its most populous place with 43,010 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Mahwah covered 26.19 square miles (67.8 km2), the largest total area of any municipality. The county hosts a park system totaling nearly 9,000 acres (3,600 ha).

Bergen County, as of the 2000 Census, was the 25th-wealthiest county in the United States by median family income at $78,079 (ranked fourth in New Jersey), 21st in per-capita income at $33,638 (fourth in the state) and 18th nationwide in percentage of households earning more than $150,000 (fourth statewide). The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 20th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the fourth highest in New Jersey) as of 2009. By 2012, the median household income in Bergen County had increased to $84,255...

At the time of first European contact, Bergen County was inhabited by Native American people, particularly the Lenape nation, whose sub-groups included the Tappan, Hackensack, and Rumachenanck (later called the Haverstraw), as named by the Dutch colonists. Some of their descendants are included among the Ramapough Mountain Indians, recognized as a tribe by the state in 1980. Their ancestors had moved into the mountains to escape encroachment by Dutch and English colonists. Their descendants reside mostly in the northwest of the county, in nearby Passaic County and in Rockland County, New York, tracing their Lenape ancestry to speakers of the Munsee language, one of three major dialects of their language. Over the years, they absorbed other ethnicities by intermarriage.

In the 17th century, the Dutch considered the area comprising today's Bergen and Hudson counties as part of New Netherland, their colonial province of the Dutch Republic. The Dutch claimed it after Henry Hudson (sailing for the Dutch East India Company) explored Newark Bay and anchored his ship at Weehawken Cove in 1609. From an early date, the Dutch began to import African slaves to fill their labor needs. Bergen County eventually was the largest slaveholding county in the state. The African slaves were used for labor at the ports to support shipping, as well as for domestic servants, trades, and farm labor.

Early settlement attempts by the Dutch included Pavonia (1633), Vriessendael (1640) and Achter Col (1642) but the Native Americans repelled these settlements in Kieft's War (1643--1645) and the Peach Tree War (1655--1660). European settlers returned to the western shores of the Hudson in the 1660 formation of Bergen Township, which would become the first permanent European settlement in the territory of present-day New Jersey.

During the Second Anglo-Dutch War, on August 27, 1664, New Amsterdam's governor Peter Stuyvesant surrendered to the English Navy. The English organized the Province of New Jersey in 1665, later splitting the territory into East Jersey and West Jersey in 1674. On November 30, 1675, the settlement Bergen and surrounding plantations and settlements were called Bergen County in an act passed by the province's General Assembly. In 1683, Bergen (along with the three other original counties of East Jersey) was officially recognized as an independent county by the Provincial Assembly.

The origin of the name of Bergen County is a matter of debate. It is believed that the county is named for one of the earliest settlements, Bergen, in modern-day Hudson County. However, the origin of the township's name is debated. Several sources attribute the name to Bergen, Norway, while others attribute it to Bergen op Zoom in the Netherlands. Still others attribute it to the Dutch word meaning "hill" or "place of safety". Some sources say that the name is derived from one of the earliest settlers of New Amsterdam (now New York City), Hans Hansen Bergen, a native of Norway, who arrived in New Netherland in 1633...

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