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Jupiter radio waves

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Published on Dec 6, 2011

Jupiter transmitting radio waves and other radiation type wavelengths from the electromagnetic spectrum that are being digitized and converted to audio format for further study
Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest planet within the Solar System; it is a gas giant with mass one-thousandth that of the Sun but is two and a half times the mass of all the other planets in our Solar System combined.
Jupiter is composed primarily of gaseous and liquid matter. The atmosphere is approximately 75% hydrogen and 24% helium by mass, with the remaining one percent of the mass consisting of other elements. The interior contains denser materials such that the distribution is roughly 71% hydrogen, 24% helium and 5% other elements by mass.
The atmosphere contains trace amounts of methane, water vapor, ammonia, and silicon-based compounds. There are also traces of carbon, ethane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, oxygen, phosphine, and sulfur. The outermost layer of the atmosphere contains crystals of frozen ammonia.
Jupiter is thought to consist of a dense core with a mixture of elements, a surrounding layer of liquid metallic hydrogen with some helium, and an outer layer predominantly of molecular hydrogen.
Jupiter has the largest planetary atmosphere in the Solar System, spanning over 5.000 km in altitude. The clouds are located in the tropopause and are arranged into bands of different latitudes, known as tropical regions. These are sub-divided into lighter-hued zones and darker belts. The interactions of these conflicting circulation patterns cause storms and turbulence. Wind speeds of 100 m/s (360 km/h) are common in zonal jets.
The orange and brown coloration in the clouds of Jupiter are caused by upwelling compounds that change color when they are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun.
The best known feature of Jupiter is the Great Red Spot, a persistent anticyclonic storm that is larger than Earth, located 22° south of the equator. It is known to have been in existence since at least 1831, and possibly since 1665. Mathematical models suggest that the storm is stable and may be a permanent feature of the planet.The Great Red Spot's dimensions are 24--40.000 km × 12--14.000 km.
Jupiter has a faint planetary ring system composed of three main segments: an inner torus of particles known as the halo, a relatively bright main ring, and an outer gossamer ring. These rings appear to be made of dust, rather than ice as with Saturn's rings.
The magnetosphere of Jupiter is responsible for intense episodes of radio emission from the planet's polar regions. Volcanic activity on the Jovian moon Io injects gas into Jupiter's magnetosphere, producing a torus of particles about the planet. As Io moves through this torus, the interaction generates Alfvén waves that carry ionized matter into the polar regions of Jupiter. As a result, radio waves are generated through a cyclotron maser mechanism, and the energy is transmitted out along a cone-shaped surface. When the Earth intersects this cone, the radio emissions from Jupiter can exceed the solar radio output.
Jupiter has 64 named natural satellites. Of these, 47 are less than 10 kilometres in diameter and have only been discovered since 1975. The four largest moons, known as the "Galilean moons", are Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto.
Jupiter has been called the Solar System's vacuum cleaner, because of its immense gravity well and location near the inner Solar System. It receives the most frequent comet impacts of the Solar System's planets.
Animated images:
1 - Jupiter surface motion animation - this effect of rotation rate varying with latitude is called differential rotation.
2 - Time-lapse sequence from the approach of Voyager 1 to Jupiter, showing the motion of atmospheric bands, and circulation of the Great Red Spot.
3 - Jupiter surface motion animation
4 - The Great Red Spot
5 - the Great Red Spot
6 - Jupiter surface motion animation
7 - The clouds show powerful turbulent motions indicating high winds.
8 - Jupiter with Ganymede, Europa and Io
9 - Jupiter with Io and Ganymede
10 - Jupiter with Io and Ganymede
11 - Jupiter and its Moons
12 - Jupiter with Io and Callisto
13 - Jupiter with Europa and Io
14 - Io's Tvashtar Volcano Movie in Slo-Mo
Images:
1 - Jupiter and the shadow of Europa
2 - Jupiter as seen by the space probe Cassini
3 - Jupiter and Io
4 - Jupiter and Io
5 - Jupiter and Io
6 - Jupiter and Ganymede
7 - Europa over Jupiter's Great Red Spot
8 - Jupiter's New Red Spot
9 - Visible-light image of Jupiter
10 - Jupiter's New Red Spot
11 - Color image of multiple P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet impacts on Jupiter
12 - Jupiter
13 - Jupiter
14 - Jupiter with auroral emissions in the polar regions
15 - Aurora on Jupiter
16 - Jupiter's Great Red Spot
17 - Io
18 - Io
19 - Europa
20 - Surface of Europa
21 - Ganymede
22 - Ganymede
23 - Callisto
24 - Surface of Callisto
25 - Surface of Callisto
26 - Jupiter vs. Earth

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