Upload

Loading...

Removing a seized platter from a 1970's BSR turntable / record changer

22,949

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Jun 1, 2013

Today, we take a look at a very common BSR record changer that was made, in some form or another, from the late '60's until the early '80's. The earlier versions contained the 16 rpm speed, while the newer ones only played 33, 45, and 78 rpm and the newest ones only played 33 rpm and 45 rpm. Some versions had a plastic platter, while other versions had a metal platter. Some versions can be found using a variety of ceramic/crystal cartridges and the higher end versions used four pole motors and a magnetic cartridge. No matter how they appear cosmetically or what features they have, the basic mechanism is the same and gives the same problems.

These changers can be found in a variety of "all-in-one" shelf/tabletop stereo systems, console stereo's, and component style systems.

The most common problem with these changers is a seized turntable platter due to hardened grease. This problem is nothing new and was a common problem 25+ years ago. Unfortunately, too many people use excessive force and/or get in too much of a hurry when attempting to remove a seized platter and the result is often a ruined record changer. These changers are not considered "hi-fi" by any means; but, they are good for their intended purpose. However, they won't take much abuse; so, take your time and be careful when servicing one.

When one encounters a BSR changer with a seized platter, the first step is to remove the retaining clip that holds the platter in place by gently prying said clip off with a small screwdriver. In some models, it will be necessary to remove the center silver decorative ring from the center of the platter by gently prying it loose with a small screwdriver. Take care not to bend this decorative piece.

Once you get the retaining clip off, apply a few drops of 3-in-1 oil around the center spindle. In some cases, all that's necessary is to let the oil soak in overnight and then the platter can then be easily lifted off. In other cases, one can apply heat from a soldering iron or hair dryer to the center spindle and the heat will cause the old grease to soften, making it easier to lift off the platter. If you use heat, use extreme caution not to melt the platter mat or the plastic platter (if your model uses a plastic platter). The best heat method is to remove the center spindle. Sometimes, it's difficult to remove this spindle; but, most of them are designed to be removed so that a single play spindle can be inserted. Once the spindle is removed, place a hot soldering iron down in the spindle well for a few minutes. Then, GENTLY rotate the platter in both directions until it becomes free enough to lift off. Never use force and under no conditions should the whole spindle assembly rotate with the platter.

Once you get the platter off, you'll need to clean all of the old grease and gunk out. Rubbing alcohol and/or contact cleaner is good for this purpose.

Another common problem for these changers is the cycling gear will become seized, just like the platter. This gear is removed the same way as the platter was removed. Again, DO NOT force this gear to turn. Once the gear is off, you'll have to clean it just like you did the turntable platter.

For relubrication, I use products such as Phonolube or white lithium grease.

Like I said before, these are usually not considered "hi-fi"; but, once properly cleaned and lubricated, they usually work trouble free for years.

The platter removal procedure can also be used on the older UA series changers from the '50's and '60's. On the older ones, I don't think the spindle is designed to easily unplug; so, use caution here.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up Next


Sign in to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...