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NEW JERUSALEM Olympics 2012 MANY CONNECTIONS

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Published on Jun 15, 2012

PALMERSTON The Trent Affair in November 1861 produced a crisis. A U.S. Navy warship stopped the British steamer Trent, and seized two Confederate envoys en route to Europe. British opinion was outraged. Lord Palmerston called the action "a declared and gross insult". He demanded the release of the two diplomats, and ordered 3,000 troops to Canada. In a letter to Queen Victoria on 5 December 1861 he said, "Great Britain is in a better state than at any former time to inflict a severe blow upon and to read a lesson to the United States which will not soon be forgotten."[69] In another letter to his Foreign Secretary the next day, he predicted war between Britain and the Union:
Succeeded by The Earl Granville
In office
18 April 1835 -- 2 September 1841
Prime Minister The Viscount Melbourne
Sir Robert Peel, Bt
Preceded by The Duke of Wellington
Succeeded by The Earl of Aberdeen
In office
22 November 1830 -- 15 November 1834
Prime Minister The Earl Grey
The Viscount Melbourne
Preceded by The Earl of Aberdeen
Succeeded by The Earl Granville
Personal details
Born 20 October 1784
Westminster
Died 18 October 1865 (aged 80)
Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire
Political party Whig and Liberal
Alma mater University of Edinburgh, University of Cambridge

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