Loading...

Best Shoulder Surgeon in US? 317-802-9686 You Decide

2,652 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Oct 7, 2012

Join Us! http://www.facebook.com/groups/failed...
Best Shoulder Surgeon in the U.S.?

317-802-9686




I perform all shoulder arthroscopy in the modified lateral decubitus positions. Typically we'll start off by marking the body landmark, allows a consistent placement of portals. The standard soft spot portal may be here. That's inferior medial but most of the portals for rotator cuff repair are really pretty close to the lateral border of the acromion, so the posterior portal for rotator cuff repair will be more lateral than perhaps classically taught. Typically, the viewing portal is directly lateral, in line with the posterior border of the AC joint and then we'll have an anterolateral and a posterolateral working portal. Typically for passage of the graft, we'll use a Twist-in cannula that's 8 internal diameter that allows us to deliver the grafts smoothly through this anterolateral portal. So here's a typical rotator cuff tear. This one I would call an L-shaped tear. Bringing that corner back, you know, the springs, everything back. Tears that are greater than 3 cm like this, we worry about healing potential and one way we've been able to significantly improve the healing rates for these large and challenging tears is to utilize MTF Allopatch HD. We're going to perform a single lateral row tension band repair. I would recommend placing our medial row sutures at the musculortendinous junction that will be used to secure the reinforcement graft prior to going in ahead with the lateral row repair of the rotator cuff. We use a total of 4 cannulas for our rotator cuff repair because it allows us to manage our suture without having to make new portals through the tissue. So here we have anterior, anterolateral, posterolateral, and then our original posterior. So that allows us circumferential access to the rotator cuff so we can place our sutures, anchors, tunnels, whatever we need very easily.
http://youtu.be/WRGmVoTqdRY

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...