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AMAZING Coke on Pork Experiment

1,473,218 views

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Published on Mar 5, 2007

Watch this one first:
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/447498/...

Cause... I get a half-cent per view. Muwhaaha...

Here's the back-story...

My roommate told me that she never ate pork because, "when you pour Coke on it, worms come out."

After I finished laughing, I caught my breath and said, "I'm no lawyer, but if I was, I'd say you were legally retarded."

She responded with, "Why the hell do you think nobody eats it?!"

I told her I was going to prove her wrong - with video. So I made this... thinking she'd say "Hahah... yeah right. Why'd you fade to black if it was only 2 minutes?!"

Instead, she watched it and said, "NOW do you believe me?!"

... She didn't care that it was ridiculously fake-looking, and I didn't expect anyone ELSE would buy it...

But then people started reposting it (it was featured on Break, Ebaumsworld, Myspace, and maybe some others). It received 3 million views in the first week from these sites alone, not to mention the half million on YouTube (where it wasn't even featured).

It generates a lot of racist and offensive comments. The interchange between commenters on Metacafe and YouTube basically went something like this:

Comment: "That's why Muslims don't eat pork, you stupid fucking Americans."
Response: "Don't you have something to blow up?"

And so on. People take pork so seriously...

Pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig (Sus domesticus), which is eaten in many countries. The word pork denotes specifically the fresh meat of the pig, but it is often mistakenly used as an all-inclusive term which includes cured, smoked, or processed meats (ham, bacon, prosciutto, etc.) It is one of the most-commonly consumed meats worldwide,[1] with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC.

Pork is eaten in various forms, including cooked (as roast pork), cured (some hams, including the Italian prosciutto) or smoked or a combination of these methods (other hams, gammon, bacon or Pancetta). It is also a common ingredient of sausages. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork. Pork is a taboo food item in Islam and Judaism, and its consumption is forbidden in these two religions.

Coca-Cola is a carbonated soft drink sold in stores, restaurants, and vending machines internationally. The Coca-Cola Company claims that the beverage is sold in more than 200 countries.[1] It is produced by The Coca-Cola Company in Atlanta, Georgia, and is often referred to simply as Coke (a registered trademark of The Coca-Cola Company in the United States since March 27, 1944). Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton, Coca-Cola was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coke to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century.

The company produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca-Cola bottlers throughout the world. The bottlers, who hold territorially exclusive contracts with the company, produce finished product in cans and bottles from the concentrate in combination with filtered water and sweeteners. The bottlers then sell, distribute and merchandise Coca-Cola to retail stores and vending machines. Such bottlers include Coca-Cola Enterprises, which is the largest single Coca-Cola bottler in North America and western Europe. The Coca-Cola Company also sells concentrate for soda fountains to major restaurants and food service distributors.

The Coca-Cola Company has, on occasion, introduced other cola drinks under the Coke brand name. The most common of these is Diet Coke, with others including Caffeine-Free Coca-Cola, Diet Coke Caffeine-Free, Coca-Cola Cherry, Coca-Cola Zero, Coca-Cola Vanilla, and special editions with lemon, lime or coffee.

In response to consumer insistence on a more natural product, the company is in the process of phasing out E211, or sodium benzoate, the controversial additive used in Diet Coke and linked to DNA damage in yeast cells and hyperactivity in children. The company has stated that it plans to remove E211 from its other products, including Sprite and Oasis, as soon as a satisfactory alternative is found.[2]

© 2007 Tobuscus

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