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Mozart Requiem in D minor, K626 FULL PERFORMANCE Herbert von Karajan Lacrimosa

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Published on Jan 16, 2012

Completed by Franz Xaver Sussmayer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_... {please,delete "G" on the end this link}Mozart's Requiem Mass (Mass #19, K626) in D Minor, written in 1791. 14 Movements. Approx 55 minutes typically.

Scored for:
SATB Choir
SATB Soloists
2 Fagoti
2 Basset Horns
2 Trumpets in D
3 Trombones (ATB)
Timpani
Strings (2 Violin, Viola, Cello)
Baso Continuo and Organo

Movements:
wiener philharmoniker
wiener singverein
1986
anna tomowa sintow
helga muller molinari
vinson cole
paata burchuladze


2:05 I. Introitus
7:34 II. Kyrie
III. Sequentia
10:16 1. Dies irae
12:09 2. Tuba mirum
16:01 3. Rex tremendae
18:22 4. Recordare
23:32 5. Confutatis
25:54 6. Lacrimosa
IV. Offertorium
29:29 1. Domine Jesu
33:22 2. Hostias
38:00 V. Sanctus
39:50 VI. Benedictus
45:30 VII. Agnus Dei
49:13 VIII. Communio


At the time of Mozart's death on 5 December 1791, only the opening movement (Requiem aeternam) was completed in all of the orchestral and vocal parts. The following Kyrie and most of the sequence (from Dies Irae to Confutatis) were complete only in the vocal parts and the continuo (the figured organ bass), though occasionally some of the prominent orchestral parts were briefly indicated, such as the violin part of the Confutatis and the musical bridges in the Recordare. The last movement of the sequence, the Lacrimosa, breaks off after only eight bars and was unfinished. The following two movements of the Offertorium were again partially done; the Domine Jesu Christe in the vocal parts and continuo (up until the fugue, which contains some indications of the violin part) and the Hostias in the vocal parts only.

Joseph von Eybler was one of the first composers to be asked to complete the score, and had worked on the movements from the Dies irae up until the Lacrimosa. In addition, a striking similarity between the openings of the Domine Jesu Christe movements in the requiems of the two composers suggests that Eybler at least looked at later sections. Following this work, he felt unable to complete the remainder, and gave the manuscript back to Constanze Mozart.
The task was then given to another composer, Franz Xaver Süssmayr. Süssmayr borrowed some of Eybler's work in making his completion, and added his own orchestration to the movements from the Kyrie onward, completed the Lacrimosa, and added several new movements which a Requiem would normally comprise: Sanctus, Benedictus, and Agnus Dei. He then added a final section, Lux aeterna by adapting the opening two movements which Mozart had written to the different words which finish the Requiem Mass, which according to both Süssmayr and Mozart's wife was done according to Mozart's directions. Whether or not that is true, some people[who?] consider it unlikely that Mozart would have repeated the opening two sections if he had survived to finish the work completely.
Since Sussmayer, there have been 7 other completions, by:
Robert D. Levin, Duncan Druce, Richard R. Maunder, Simon Andrews, Franz Beyer, H.C. Robbins Landon, and Joshua M. Abramson.

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