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Electrons, Protons And Neutrons | Standard Model Of Particle Physics

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Published on Nov 19, 2009

http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... The Standard Model of Particle Physics (Chapter 5): Electrons, Protons And Neutrons.

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STANDARD MODEL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Best0fSci...

1) First Second Of The Universe:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HXPYO...
2) Force And Matter:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5QXZ0...
3) Quarks:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxQwkd...
4) Gluons:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYPem0...
5) Electrons, Protons And Neutrons:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi91qy...
6) Photons, Gravitons & Weak Bosons:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHVC6F...
7) Neutrinos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7QAaH...
8) The Higgs Boson / The Higgs Mechanism:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_HrQV...

The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory of three of the four known fundamental interactions and the elementary particles that take part in these interactions. These particles make up all visible matter in the universe.

Every high energy physics experiment carried out since the mid-20th century has eventually yielded findings consistent with the Standard Model.

Still, the Standard Model falls short of being a complete theory of fundamental interactions because it does not include gravitation, dark matter, or dark energy. It is not quite a complete description of leptons either, because it does not describe nonzero neutrino masses, although simple natural extensions do.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard...

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ELECTRONS

The particle itself is a fundamental particle and is too small to be seen by any imaginable instrument of observation. So we instead represent the properties that allow the electron to interact. The central small dot represents the weak charge of the electron. This charge entirely separate from electric charge gives rise to the Weak Nuclear Force.

This force causes radioactive decay and its typical range is much smaller than the diameter of a proton.
The larger volume of shifting purple is meant to represent the Electric Charge of the electron. This charge is the generator of the Electromagnetic Force which has infinite range although the drop off in strength is pretty dramatic as we move away from the electron.

The Electromagnetic Force is how electrons interact with other electrically charged particles and with magnetic fields. These interactions make the structure of atoms and molecules possible. This gives rise to almost all of the complexity that we see around us.

PROTONS

The Proton is composed of two up quarks and one down quark (as you can see from the tiny rings of color near the center of each quark.) The overall charge of the proton is positive and so we have given it a gold shell. (Note that we can simply add the charges of the individual quarks to get the charge of the proton).

The red, green, and blue colors of the quarks represent the color charge which generates the Strong Nuclear Force that holds them together. It comes in three different charges represented here by the three colors, and for different colors the force is attractive.

The mediator of the Strong Force (the particle that is exchanged in an interaction) is a gluon. We represent gluon exchange as the occasional wispy strings between the quarks. As you can see the gluons have color themselves, and each gluon exchange causes the quarks involved to swap color. Although we show the quark motion inside the proton as leisurely, they are actually traveling close to the speed of light.

NEUTRONS

The Neutron is composed of two down quarks and one up quark (as you can see from the tiny rings of color near the center of each quark.) The overall charge of the neutron is neutral and so we have given it a silver shell. (note that we can simply add the charges of the individual quarks to get the charge of the neutron. )

The red, green, and blue colors of the quarks represent the color charge that generates the Strong Nuclear Force that holds them together. It comes in three charges represented here by the three colors, and for different colors the force is attractive.

The mediator of the Strong Force (the particle that is exchanged in an interaction) is a gluon. We represent gluon exchange as the occasional wispy strings between the quarks. As you can see the gluons have color themselves, and each gluon exchange causes the quarks involved to swap color. Although we show the quark motion inside the neutron as leisurely, they are actually traveling close to the speed of light.

http://www.cassiopeiaproject.com
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