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Governor Christie Signs Open Space Legislation

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Uploaded on Aug 3, 2011

Governor Christie builds on commitment to protect New Jersey's environment by signing legislation to protect Open Space
and Recreational Development in the Garden State (Transcript Below).

Governor Christie: Good morning everybody. As I said when I walked up, sorry for being a week late but I'm glad to be back here with the Doyles. This farm has been in their family for generations. I met the seventh generation this morning who hopefully will continue to work and live on this farm, and that's what this morning is in part all about. It's about trying to preserve a certain quality of life in a state that also has valued its ability to develop and develop new residents, new businesses, but trying to find a balance between having open space in our state and preserving a certain quality and way of life for the Garden State but also finding that balance with continuing to have economic growth and development in a state where people need jobs and we need to continue to grow the size and the scope of our economy so today we're out here at this farm in Hillsborough in the middle of Somerset County in a county that has a tradition of open space and Green Acres support, not only from the state but from the freeholders and from their local municipal officials. There are two examples rather of the 650,000 acres of land that's been preserved through this program over the last fifty years. I am happy now to be one of the governors who is a part of that great tradition. The three bills that I signed today continue this tradition with $157M for preservation projects in all twenty-one counties across New Jersey including the Highlands, the Barnegat Bay watershed, urban waterfronts as I said before, farms like this, and other worthy projects across the state. It's important to note also that this is again an example of bipartisan cooperation in New Jersey. You see here today both Republican and Democratic legislators. The preserving of our quality of life is not a Republican or a Democratic issue. It's a New Jersey issue. And so folks from both sides of the aisle have sponsored this legislation, voted for this legislation, and helped us in the implementation of these programs by targeting for us worthy projects throughout the state in every one of the twenty-one counties. I think it's important to take a moment again today especially in light of all the things we see going on in Washington, DC, and the lack of cooperation among many of the folks who sit in Congress. The most important thing though to emphasize today again is there are a lot of things that need to get done in this state. The only way to get it done is for all of us one to firmly set out the positions and our priorities, what we believe in, so that the public understands what we believe as elected leaders are important and what we're willing to fight for. Then once you lay that out, to then go back to your colleagues in the Legislature and in the agencies and work together to find common ground to be able to implement those principles. It won't mean as I've said before that I'll get everything I want. I certainly haven't over the first eighteen months I've been Governor. But we've gotten a lot done for the people of the state, both parties working together, finding common ground. It doesn't mean we won't argue at times. We will and we should. We should have arguments in public about important public issues. We should stake out our positions, but that useful argument is only part of the democratic process. The next part of the democratic process after the argument is get something done and that's what we're trying to do here in New Jersey every day. That's what our administration has been about, recognizing that we preside over a divided government but understanding that we don't preside over a divided people. That's a big difference.

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