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Izatt on how the SuperLig technology (and molecular recognition) is critical to green technology

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Published on May 25, 2016

May 24, 2016 -- Ucore Rare Metals Inc. (TSXV: UCU | OTCQX: UURAF) partner IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. is a privately held corporation headquartered near Salt Lake City in American Fork, Utah. IBC was founded in 1988 by, and named after, three distinguished professors, Reed M. Izatt, Jerald S. Bradshaw, and the late James J. Christensen who possess prominent international reputations and experience in macrocyclic chemistry, selective metal ion separations, and Molecular Recognition Technology (MRT ).

Large-scale MRT separation systems incorporate SuperLig® solid phase particles (~0.5mm) such as silica gel or polymer substrates to which the selective ligand has been chemically attached. The SuperLig® beads are packed into fixed-bed columns that are built in skid-mounted modular form, and are fully automated for continuous operation. The feed solution is passed through the column and the target specie is removed selectively from the solution.

In this presentation at the CleanTech and Technology Metals Summit, held in Toronto on May 10-11th, Steven R. Izatt of IBC outlined
◾Development and use of molecules with structure-specific interactions of high selectivity.
◾How these can strip off selected elements, e.g. dysprosium, and then the rare earth elements go to another column where another element is selected
◾Why this science is critical to green technology
◾And IBC’s relationship with Ucore Rare Metals Inc. (TSXV: UCU | OTCQX: UURAF)

Disclaimer: Ucore Rare Metals Inc. is an advertorial member of InvestorIntel.

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