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Maine Medical Association Not Qualified to Counsel Parents on Vaccination

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Published on May 20, 2015

This year in Maine, five vaccine bills were introduced.

Maine Legislator, Dr. Linda Sanborn has introduced LD 471, An Act To Improve Childhood Vaccination Rates in Maine, which would mandate that parents must receive vaccine counseling with a physician before they would be allowed to file a philosophical or religious school exemption. The bill was written by the Maine Medical Association (AMA).

In response, Rep. Beth O'Connor has introduced LD 1076, An Act To Enact the Vaccine Consumer Protection Program, which would mandate that physicians must be educated on the HHS Vaccine Injury Compensation Program and its table of vaccine injuries, along with the information on vaccine package inserts, so they can prevent, diagnose and treat vaccine injuries, as well as helping vaccine injured families navigate the VICP. The bill was written by the Maine Coalition for Vaccine Choice.

After a long day of testimony on two vaccine exemption restriction bills including LD 471, the time finally came for testimony on LD 1076. All of the opposition to parental rights had gone home for the day, except for the Maine Medical Association, who stayed to testify against vaccine injury parents trying to get proper medical care for their children.

Peter Michaud, JD, RN, and lobbyist for the MMA, talked for 20 minutes, displayed a complete ignorance of what the bill was about, and eventually admitted that he didn't know anything about the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... while opposing a bill to educate health care providers on the Vaccine Injury Compensation Pogram because the MMA doesn't think that doctors should have to be educated on the Vaccine Injury
Compensation Program.

Watch the Maine Medical Association show that it does even know what it doesn't know.

If a doctor does not know the potential adverse reactions to a medical product, then they are not qualified to advise on it to their patients or deliver it to them. Period.

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