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Visions of Anarchy - James Scott, David Friedman, & Robert Ellickson

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Published on Dec 9, 2016

A rare conversation among eminent exponents of left-wing anarchism, anarcho-capitalism, and classical liberalism. See below the fold for full info & cue times.

The Symposium was held at Trinity College, Connecticut, on Monday, November 14, 2016.

James Scott (Yale U.), author of "Two Cheers for Anarchism," makes the case for anarchy as an ethos of mutuality without hierarchy, and a praxis of resistance to State coercion.

David Friedman (Santa Clara Law), author of "The Machinery of Freedom: Guide to a Radical Capitalism," makes the case for anarchism as coordination by markets—and recites a poem against Hobbes.

Robert Ellickson (Yale Law), author of "Order without Law: How Neighbors Settle Disputes," moderates the exchange and makes the case for government provision of infrastructure, a safety net, and regulation of pollution.

The speakers also answer questions from the audience.

The Symposium was funded by the Shelby Cullom Davis Endowment, the Cesare Barbieri Endowment for Italian Culture, & the John Templeton Foundation, through a grant from the Institute for Humane Studies.

Cue times:
James Scott: 0:00:29
David Friedman: 0:24:25
Robert Ellickson: 0:46:15
Question about inequality & productivity: 1:04:20
Question about justice in anarcho-capitalism: 1:06:12
Questions: Who will guard the guardians? And how can anarchy provide national defense?: 1:10:18
Question: Shouldn't anarchists prove themselves by solving problems that governments have failed to solve? 1:19:58
Question about current resistance movements that have established zones of autonomy from the State: 1:21:30
Final rejoinders: 1:24:08

Note: Audio in parts of Q&A and final remarks had to be boosted in post-production. Consequently, those few segments of the audio track have noise—but are intelligible.

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