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Galvanic Skin Response (G.S.R.) Testing

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Uploaded on Nov 6, 2007

The body is comprised of various systems that respond to stimuli. The smell of food (stimulus) triggers the mouth to salivate (response). A loud noise (stimulus) triggers the release of adrenaline into the blood and an increased heart rate (response). There are various ways to measure the body's response to stimuli, including GSR or Galvanic Skin Response. GSR measures the conductivity (how well something conducts electricity) of the largest organ in the body, the skin. The conductivity of the skin was first discovered around 1888 by Tarchanoff. In the early 1900s, Dr. Carl Jung found that GSR measurements could track physiological arousal or stress in the body. In the 1930s, Dr. Hans Selye began to uncover the importance of understanding stress and its impact upon the different systems of the body. Discovering the importance of stress in the body, its effect on our health, and its ability to be measured in the body through GSR led to the creation of many common devices, such as the polygraph test.

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