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Visiting a Kerr black hole (corrected version / combined view)

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Published on Mar 7, 2011

Journey of an observer falling inside a(n ideal) Kerr black hole and emerging in a parallel universe. (The black hole has a mass of roughly one million solar masses (Schwarzschild radius = 10 light seconds) and an angular momentum at 80% of maximality (a/M=0.8). The observer has an energy of 1.2 times its mass and zero angular momentum along the black hole's axis.)

The upper left quadrant is the observer's front view (for a somewhat arbitrary definition of "front"), the upper right quadrant is their rear view. The lower left quadrant displays the trajectory on a polar plane cut (external horizon is red, internal horizon is green, static limit is dashed and is not seen in the video, cut discontinuity is purple, and trajectory is blue) and in a Penrose diagram (outer (I) blocks are shown in blue, inner (III) blocks are shown in pink, and intermediate (II) blocks are shown in light or dark grey according as they are white hole or black hole regions; the trajectory is again shown in blue). The bottom right quadrant shows the Boyer-Lindquist coordinates and their derivative with respect to the proper time (s) of the observer.

In the video, a blue sphere is placed outside the black hole at some distance, a purple sphere is placed in negative space (i.e., beyond the singularity cut), and the outer and inner horizons are various shades of red and green in the same color scheme as in the Penrose diagram (lighter shades are white hole horizons, darker shades are black hole horizons). All spheres are checkered in an identical way, with twenty-four longitudinal stripes and twelve latitudinal (or polar) stripes, consistent with the black hole's axis. (The longitudinal stripes on the horizons rotate with the black hole.) The ring singularity itself is not visible as such, but appears as the edge rim of the purple region.

See the "front view version" of this video ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USkkqB... ) for the front view alone, in better quality.

Note: This is a mathematical abstraction: while the parameters (mass and angular momentum) for this black hole are typical for certain real black holes (namely those found in galactic nuclei), physical black holes are not thought to possess any "white hole" component, at least in the past region: so a physical black hole would appear, well, black, and there wouldn't be much of interest to see (and what happens beyond the inner horizon in a physical black hole is pretty much unknown).

Note 2: A previous version of this video was already posted on YouTube ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cGwY8W... ). This one differs from the previous one in that the grids on the horizons are shown to rotate with the black hole (which is reasonable for a rotating black hole), and also in that the value of the Boyer-Lindquist t coordinate has been fixed.

More explanation, other videos and higher quality download ← http://www.madore.org/~david/math/ker...

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