Loading...

Income Inequality Discussion - Nick Hanauer

3,659 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on May 18, 2012

Billionaire Nick Hanauer recently spoke at TED Talk about income inequality. After the speech, TED decided it was not going to release it to the public..
http://www.sott.net/articles/show/245...

If you're plugged into the Internet, chances are you've seen a TED talk - the wonky, provocative web videos that have become a sort of nerd franchise. TED.com is where the slogan of the nonprofit group behind the site is "Ideas Worth Spreading."

TED organizers invited a multimillionaire Seattle venture capitalist named Nick Hanauer - the first nonfamily investor in Amazon.com - to give a speech on March 1 at their TED University conference. Inequality was the topic - specifically, Hanauer's contention that the middle class, and not wealthy innovators like himself, are America's true "job creators."

You can't find that speech online. TED officials told Hanauer initially they were eager to distribute it. "I want to put this talk out into the world!" one of them wrote him in an e-mail in late April. But early this month they changed course, telling Hanauer that his remarks were too "political" and too controversial for posting.

Other TED talks posted online veer sharply into controversial and political territory, including NASA scientist James Hansen comparing climate change to an asteroid barreling toward Earth, and philanthropist Melinda Gates pushing for more access to contraception in the developing world.

Hanauer's talk "probably ranks as one of the most politically controversial talks we've ever run, and we need to be really careful when" to post it, Anderson wrote on April 6. "Next week ain't right. Confidentially, we already have Melinda Gates on contraception going out. Sorry for the mixed messages on this."

"Many of the talks given at the conference or at TED-U are not released," Anderson wrote. "We only release one a day on TED.com and there's a backlog of amazing talks from all over the world. We do not comment publicly on reasons to release or not release [a] talk. It's unfair on the speakers concerned. But we have a general policy to avoid talks that are overtly partisan, and to avoid talks that have received mediocre audience ratings."

"But even if the talk was rated a home run, we couldn't release it, because it would be unquestionably regarded as out and out political. We're in the middle of an election year in the US. Your argument comes down firmly on the side of one party. And you even reference that at the start of the talk. TED is nonpartisan and is fighting a constant battle with TEDx organizers to respect that principle....

"Nick, I personally share your disgust at the growth in inequality in the US, and would love to have found a way to give people a clearer mindset on the issue, without stoking a tedious partisan rehash of all the arguments we hear every day in the mainstream media.

"Alas, my judgment - and it is just a judgment, and that's why my job title is 'curator' - is that publishing your talk would not meet that goal."

  • Category

  • License

    • Standard YouTube License

Loading...

to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...