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AP Lit Final Video

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Published on May 7, 2012

As I sit here typing this, with exactly one week of high school left, the realization occurs to me that I am not the same girl I was when I first walked through the doors of Triad High School four years ago. Physically, yes, I am still me. In terms of personality, knowledge, etc., though, I feel like a completely different person. The past four years have been filled with numerous ups and downs, and learning from each of those experiences has shaped me into who I am today -- both the good and the bad.
Honestly, I believe the negatives in life (the pain, the suffering, the sadness) are much more effective at teaching a lesson, if not many. Most of the human race, or at least most Americans, will sit and watch life pass them by, and do nothing about it. Sure, they know of all the wrongs in the world, but why act on it if it is not affecting them? It is only when something unexpected (usually tragic or catastrophic) happens, that humans "wake up and smell the roses," for lack of a better phrase. Tragedy causes humans to realize what they have, or had, and is essentially a catalyst in bringing humans to act on their feelings. Unfortunately, my personal catalyst has come most recently in the form of the passing of a young man by the name of Caleb Richards, whom I am proud to say was my very first friend in this life. His death, of which still causes me heartache and I still do not (and probably will never) understand, has made me see that I should not take loved ones for granted, because another day on this earth is promised to no one. It has also made me try to keep in better touch with my friends that live far away, as I now realize I should have done with him.
Humans will learn and grow from the pain, as I am beginning to learn and grow from mine. It is this growing process, and inner strength that many find in times of sorrow, which unites the human race. Most people will go on to triumph after a devastating loss, whether it be carrying on the legacy of a loved one, or volunteering at Habitat for Humanity after their own house has been destroyed by a hurricane. For many, personal triumph comes in the form of getting back to a "normal" life.
This project asks me to define language, in addition to humanity. Language is this, what I am doing right now -- telling you about my thoughts, what I have learned, and how I feel. In short, language is emotion. It can be both spoken or unspoken, as I believe any form of body language is every bit as powerful as a monologue, if not more so. Composition, in turn, is the writing of these feelings, and for those who are so talented, the writing of these feelings can make a beautiful work of art: literature.
This class has taught me so much more than how to efficiently study literature, annotate, and take good notes. I have learned, through my own personal tragedies and failures (for example, my heartbreaking grade on the very first vocabulary test), that this class mirrors life: change, this time in the form of annotating and good note-taking, is inevitable if one wants to triumph.

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