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MaximsNewsNetwork: CANCER CRISIS FUTURE PANDEMIC: IAEA

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Published on Nov 3, 2009

MaximsNewsNetwork: 03 October 2009 - IAEA: As the world focused on talks to supply Iran with nuclear fuel at IAEA headquarters in Vienna last week, one floor down, a silent crisis was being discussed. Cancer - and the imminent pandemic that will hit the developing world. Within 20 years - 70 percent of cancer patients will be in low income countries.

As the worlds media focused on talks to supply Iran with nuclear fuel at the IAEAs headquarters in Vienna last week, one floor down, a silent crisis was also being discussed.
Largely ignored by the media, its the worlds biggest killer. Cancer, and the imminent pandemic that will hit the developing world. Within 20 years seventy percent of cancer patients will be in low income countries.
SOUNDBITE (English) Professor Peter Boyle, President, International Prevention Research Institute:
My big concern for the future is the growth of the number of new cases that will occur. Its impact on families, its impact on premature death, thats the major thing thats going to happen, thats the major priority that we have got to face up to the human aspects of the growth that is going to take place in cancer.

Today about one quarter of the all the world cancer is found in China. And as the population ages, and the effect of risk factors such as cigarette smoking takes hold, cancers will surge.
SOUNDBITE (English) Professor Peter Boyle, President, International Prevention Research Institute:
International Prevention Research Institute: Chinas just a model. India is going to be the same, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey, Russia; all these countries with huge populations are going to go through the same experience in the next twenty to thirty years.

For many, cancer is a disease of great shame and pain with few, if any options for treatment. Twenty-seven of the 53 countries in Africa have no radiotherapy services at all: no screening, no early diagnosis, no palliative care.
SOUNDBITE (English) Massound Samiei, Head IAEA Programme Of Action For Cancer
Therapy:
"Especially if you look at cancers of women, like cervical cancer and breast cancer there are lots of women who die unnecessarily can be cured and that is why the IAEA is in a position to intervene and help those countries

The IAEA and its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy is teaming with the World Health Organization and others in the cancer control fight -- to build a greater Global Force against the disease. PACT is training local staff, and identifying countries most pressing cancer needs, so that donors can respond effectively

SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Nancy Brinker, WHO Goodwill Ambassador & Susan G. Komen Foundation, Founding Chair:
This isnt rocket science. Its about understanding and applying what we know. This work isnt sexy, its not glamorous, and its not the kind of science that gets people on fire. What it does do is reach into the hearts and minds of people. And now we have to reach into the pockets of Government, of huge Government Agencies to make commitments and have the political will to make all the treatments, screening and diagnosis that we enjoy or have available in one form or another in low resource countries.
For those stuck in the endless queue for treatment, this can not come fast enough.

MaximsNewsNetwork:
News Network for the United Nations and the International Community.
See: http://www.MaximsNews.com.
"GIVING POWER & RESONANCE TO THE VOICE OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY"

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