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Hospital First Receiver: Mass Decontamination 2003

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Uploaded on Feb 9, 2009

Healthcare workers and hospital employees risk occupational exposures to chemical, biological, or radiological materials when a hospital receives contaminated patients, particularly during mass casualty incidents. These hospital employees, who may be termed first receivers, work at a site remote from the location where the hazardous substance release occurred. This means that their exposures are limited to the substances transported to the hospital on victims' skin, hair, clothing, or personal effects. The location and limited source of contaminant distinguishes first receivers from other first responders (e.g., firefighters, law enforcement, and ambulance service personnel), who typically respond to the incident site. Hospital first receivers in the US are covered under OSHA's Standard on Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). However, OSHA recognizes that first receivers have somewhat different training and personal protective equipment (PPE) needs than first responders working in the hazardous substance release zone. In December 2004, OSHA released its OSHA BEST PRACTICES for HOSPITAL-BASED FIRST RECEIVERS OF VICTIMS from Mass Casualty Incidents Involving the Release of Hazardous Substances (http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/bestprac... ). In this best practices document, OSHA provides practical information to address employee protection and training as part of emergency planning for mass casualty incidents involving hazardous substances. OSHA considers sound planning the first line of defense in all types of emergencies (including emergencies involving chemical, biological, or radiological substances). For more information on First Receivers, go to the OSHA website for Emergency Preparedness and Response http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypre... . This is clipped from the 2003 DVD, Dont Be a Victim: Medical Management of Patients Contaminated with Chemical Agents, from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

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