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Tibet Oral History Project: Interview with Tashi Nyima on 7/1/2007

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Published on Jan 19, 2018

The interpreter's English translation provided during this interview is potentially incomplete and/or inaccurate. If you are not fluent in Tibetan, please refer to the interview transcript for the complete and correct English translation. Read the interview transcript in English at http://tibetoralhistory.org/Interview...

** This interview about life in Tibet was conducted by the Tibet Oral History Project. This non-profit organization aims to preserve the history and culture of the Tibetan people by interviewing elderly Tibetan refugees about life in Tibet before and after the Chinese invasion. Learn more at http://www.TibetOralHistory.org.

** Interview Summary: Tashi Nyima was born in the village of Tsakhalowa, meaning 'village of salt.' He gives an account of how salt was made on rooftops in his village. At around the age of 12 or 13 his father taught him to inscribe mani 'prayers' on stones. He did this work until he was 17 or 18 when he became a transporter/trader. When he was 18 years old Tashi Nyima went to China to buy tea bricks, pork and other goods to sell in Lhasa. At that time he witnessed the Communist Chinese forces massacring supporters of Chang Kai Shek's Kuomintang regime. When he returned to Tibet and the Chinese invaded his region, he saw them dividing the rich Tibetans from the poor and using the poor to humiliate the rich. Tashi Nyima was one of the few Tibetans who visited India before 1959. As a trader, he transported goods between Phari and India. The Chinese began arresting all of the traders, but Tashi Nyima managed to escape and went to India.

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