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Shelby Cobra 427 (1966) Review Test Drive On Driver San Francisco 2011

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Published on Sep 7, 2011

Here at The Controller Online, we don't want to ever spoil the story for anyone, so you can relax, sit back and enjoy this review. Now, in order to explain some of the games features I will need to expose a little bit about the story from the beginning. You will be playing as John Tanner a detective in San Francisco. You and your partner Tobias Jones watch as the notorious crime lord, you helped arrest, is being transported to jail, his name is Charles Jericho. Driver: SF takes place six months after "Driv3r", Jericho finds a way to escape and take control of the transport vehicle. As you chase after him, racing through an alleyway, your car is badly struck. After the accident John Tanner has the ability to leave his body and take control of any car he wants. I thought this idea was sort of, well, ridiculous at first, but then I remembered it was a video game and anything is possible. After playing the game for a few hours I realized this was actually an amazing feature, which is referred to as "Shift". When you shift you can move around the map, but you will be restricted to the roads, you can't pass over buildings or land, that ability comes as you progress through the game.

The AC Cobra, also known colloquially as the Shelby Cobra in North America, is an Anglo-American sports car that was produced during the 1960s.Like many British specialist manufacturers, AC Cars had been using the smooth, refined Bristol straight-6 engine in its small-volume production, including its AC Ace 2-seater roadster. This had a hand-built body with a steel tube frame, and aluminium body panels that were made using English wheeling machines. The engine was a pre-World War II design of BMW which by the 1960s was considered dated. Bristol decided in 1961 to cease production of its engine and instead to use Chrysler 331 cid (5.4 L) V8 engines. Although untrue, it is commonly believed that AC was left without a future source of power and that American ex-racing driver Carroll Shelby saved the company from bankruptcy. AC started using the 2.6 litre Ford Zephyr engine in its cars. In September 1961, Shelby airmailed AC a letter asking them if they would build him a car modified to accept a V8 engine.

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