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UK government forced to put off plans for war on Syria

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Published on Aug 29, 2013

British Prime Minister David Cameron has put off his plans to support a military strike against Syria after coming under domestic and international pressure, Press TV reports.


The British government's efforts over the past days to garner support for military intervention in Syria were met with opposition by lawmakers from the country's major political parties, including the Labour Party.

Protests similar to those opposing the war on Iraq in 2003 have also been held on Downing Street against Cameron's plans for supporting an attack on Syria.

Anti-war campaigners are also voicing opposition to the potential military strike against Syria.

"Only nine percent in the latest UK poll think that this attack on Syria is a good idea. If I were an MP, I'd be worried about those figures...," said John Rees, with the Stop the War Coalition.

Cameron has recalled the UK parliament for an emergency session on Thursday.

The UK government said a second vote on a strike against Syria would come after the UN chemical weapons investigation team releases the results of its probe on the sites where chemical agents have been used inside Syria.

Since August 27, speculations became stronger about the possibility of a military attack on Syria. Media outlets reported US plans for likely surgical attacks, which would be in the form of "cruise-missile strikes," and "could rely on four US destroyers in the Mediterranean [Sea]." The plan was said to be awaiting US President Barack Obama's go-ahead.

Although the UK strike delay seems to have slowed down the momentum for war, it by no means has eradicated the possibility of unilateral action by the US. Washington said that it is willing to go ahead with its plans for a strike on Syria even without the approval of the United Nations or the support of its allies.

The UN, as well as Iran, Russia, and China have cautioned against war.

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