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EU remain campaigner Theresa May crowned UK PM - 150k Tory members denied a vote

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Published on Jul 13, 2016

Interview with Tony Gosling begins here
https://youtu.be/PjUbP39AAfo?t=51s

David Cameron has chaired his last cabinet meeting as Britain’s Prime Minister, as his successor Theresa May is gearing up to take over.
The meeting was held at Number 10 Downing Street on Tuesday where May was confirmed as the new Conservative leader and prime minister-in-waiting. It was rounded off with tributes to outgoing premier Cameron. May is slated to take up office by Wednesday evening. The 59-year-old will be the second female British prime minister after Margaret Thatcher. May is already under immense pressure from the European Union leaders to invoke Article 50 of the bloc's constitution, which sets the clock ticking on two years of formal exit talks. She is also facing calls from opposition politicians to call early general elections. May will encounter an uphill task to overcome the economic uncertainty triggered by the Brexit.
Tony Gosling
Investigative Journalist

this just disappeared off the Telegraph website - funny that
Theresa May is a great self-promoter, but a terrible Home Secretary
1 JULY 2016 • 10:25AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/...
http://order-order.com/2016/07/02/rea...
In the run-up to the 2015 election, one of the handicaps David Cameron had to finesse was the fact that net migration to the UK was three times as high as he had promised it would be. Remarkably, none of the opprobrium this failure provoked brought forth the name of Theresa May, the cabinet minister actually entrusted with bringing migration down. Then, as now, it was as if the icy Home Secretary had a dark magic that warded off all critical scrutiny.
The fact that her lead role in this fiasco went unnoticed and unmentioned likely reflects Mrs May’s brilliant, all-consuming efforts to burnish her image with a view to become prime minister.
After all, Mrs May’s tenure as Home Secretary has been little better than disastrous – a succession of derelictions that has left Britain’s borders and coastline at least as insecure as they were in 2010, and which mean that British governments still rely on guesswork to estimate how many people enter and leave the country.
People find this hard to credit because she exudes determination and strength. Few who follow British politics would deny that she is a deadly political infighter. Indeed Theresa May is to Westminster what Cersei Lannister is to Westeros in Game of Thrones: no one who challenges her survives undamaged, while the welfare of the realm is of secondary concern.
Take the demoralised, underfunded UK Border Force. As the public discovered after a people-smugglers’ vessel ran aground in May, it has has only three cutters protecting 7,700 miles of coastline. Italy by contrast has 600 boats patrolling its 4722 miles.
Considering the impression Mrs May gives of being serious about security, it’s all the more astonishing that she has also allowed the UK’s small airfields to go unpatrolled - despite the vastly increased terrorist threat of the last few years, the onset of the migration crisis, and the emergence of smuggling networks that traffic people, drugs and arms.
Then there is the failure to establish exit checks at all the country’s airports and ports. These were supposed to be in place by March 2015.
Mrs May has kept so quiet about this and other scandals - such as the collapse of the eBorders IT system, at cost of almost a billion pounds - that you might imagine someone else was in charge the Home Office.
It’s not just a matter of the odd error. Yvette Cooper pointed out in 2013 that despite Coalition rhetoric, the number of people refused entry to the UK had dropped by 50 per cent, the backlog of finding failed asylum seekers had gone up and the number of illegal immigrants deported had gone down.]
In general Mrs May has avoided taking on the most serious institutional problems that afflict British policing. These include a disturbing willingness by some forces to let public relations concerns determine policing priorities, widespread overreliance on CCTV, the widespread propensity to massage crime numbers, the extreme risk aversion manifested during the London riots, and the preference for diverting police resources to patrol social media rather than the country’s streets.
David Laws’ memoirs paint a vivid picture of a secretive, rigid, controlling, even vengeful minister, so unpleasant to colleagues that a dread of meetings with her was something that cabinet members from both parties could bond over.
Unsurprisingly, Mrs May’s overwhelming concern with taking credit and deflecting blame made for a difficult working relationship with her department, just as her propensity for briefing the press against cabinet colleagues made her its most disliked member in two successive governments.

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