Loading...

Golden Eagle attacking ewe and lamb

20,023 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on May 4, 2012

In the article in the Scottish Farmer SNH offered advice to farmers and crofters, so, I quickly approached them on 11/5. Two weeks later, someone gets back saying it was a communication error between their Press Officer and the Scottish Farmer, and they can't provide any advice. That person tried to put the blame for losses onto everything he could think off, including hill walkers with dogs off lead. I should point out, the areas worst affected, are the most remote areas, hence the least used by hill walkers. He suggested I applied for a licence to cull the eagles, but who do we apply to; SNH, so, I shall not hold my breath. We have also to provide sufficient evidence, which would mean neglecting the rest of the sheep, so that I could sit and wait for attacks. Should anyone question the above; I taped the conversation. One thing I would like to ask the RSPB and SNH who claim that eagles only take weak lambs, is how do they know the lambs are weak? When the sheep are sleeping or even sunbathing when the sun does make appearance, they lie in the most peculiar positions, and frequently have me wondering if they are alive or dead. It isn't until you make a noise or approach them you know they are still living, never mind weak or strong. The lambs are most vulnerable to the eagle when they are either sunbathing, sleeping or grouped up with a gang of other lambs to play. At all of those points; they have no protection from their mother and have no chance against an eagle.
Golden Eagle attacking one very alive lamb - this is the third attack I have witnessed in the last four days. The lamb is definitely not carrion. I had been informed by a guy who was carrying out a birds of prey survey that Golden Eagles are only supposed to eat dead lambs. There is plenty of carrion on the hill. We didn't lamb any sheep on the hill last year, but 2 years back, there was a part of the hill, where there are usually lots of lambs, there wasn't a living lamb left in that part, we can only assume that the eagles had them all, since the vermin which can be legally controlled, is very controlled in deed. I would like to point out that this eagle is MILES away from any nest, and I have seen them attacking sheep in areas MILES apart. I don't claim to be a bird of prey expert, in fact I am not interested in them at all. One only presumed Bird of Prey enthusiasts should know what they are talking about. I am also pretty sure, the sheep didn't think the eagle was just trying to give it a cuddle and must have been very distressed about the attack. When I first came on this eagle, it was attacking a ewe and lamb on a grass river bank, but after I drove towards it, it moved up hill, onto the ewe and lamb that I videoed. I then followed it 2 miles and watched it dive down on ewes with very young lambs - it was further into the hill, hence I was unable to video those attacks.
Why should farmers have to put up with this? Would those that think Eagles of various types should be present be happy if it was attacking their dog or cat?

I had a journalist call and they seemed very surprised that a farmer should care for their animals or be generally interested in animals. So, I thought I would create a slide show of some of my photographs as I feel they give a good insight to our interests. I have posted two slide shows containing photographs that were grouped in 2 folders, both showing a range of the photographs I have taken, not necessary the best, but most convenient. It would take some time to troll through and select the most appropriate and best out of 16,500 photographs.

Here are the links;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqHn3...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NA3V9...

The majority of stock farmers have chosen to keep livestock because of their appreciation of the animals. It is very much in the farmers interest both financially and from a welfare point of view to do their best for their livestock. Agricultural shows are very much about the farmers proudly showing off their animals that they may have brought on or bred themselves, improving and perfecting over numerous generations, to try and create the perfect specimen.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...