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John Wesley Not everyone who says Lord will enter the kingdom of Heaven

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Published on Apr 27, 2011

Not everyone that sayeth unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? And in thy name have cast out devils? And in Thy name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you; depart from me, ye that work iniquity.

Therefore whosoever heareth of these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a Wise man, which built his house upon a rock: and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the wind's blew, and beat upon the house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock. And every one that heareth the sayings of mine, which built his house upon the sand: and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the wind's blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it. Matthew 7:21-27.

From Notes in "The standard Sermons of John Wesley 1771:

This sermon was preached at Bexley in January 1753. I went to St Saviours gate Church in York. At close of prayers the rector sent the sexton to tell me that the pulpit was at my service. I preached on the conclusion of the Gospel for the day " Not everyone that sayeth unto me Lord, Lord" O did not see one person laugh or smile although we had an elegant congregation.

In an article by Daniel M'Allum in the Methodist magazine 1887, he says: "At that th=time the Reverend Cordeux was incumbent of the living of St Saviours and he warned his congregation against hearing "that vagabond Wesley preach". Mr Wesley came to the city on a Saturday, preached in Peaseholme chapel and again on Sunday morning. In the forenoon of that day he when to St Saviour's church dressed in his canonicals. The clergy in the course of reading the prayers saw a stranger cleric, and sent an officer to invite him to take the pulpit. He accepted the invitation, and stuck his text from the gospel of the day Matthew 7: 21. After service the vicar asked the clerk if he knew who the stranger was. "sir" said he, "he is the vagabond Wesley, of whom you warned us" Aye indeed," was the reply "we trapped; but never mind, we had a good sermon." The Dean heard of the affair, and threatened to lay a complaint before the Archbishop. Mr. Cordeux, afraid of the consequences, took an early opportunity, when some occasion brought him into the presence of his grace, to tell him that he had allowed Mr. Wesley to occupy his pulpit. "and you did right," said that prelate. The matter of the complaint was never more heard of; and Mr. Cordeux was so far from repenting of what he had done, that some years afterwards he made a second offer of his pulpit, and Mr. Wesley preached upon the eight Beatitudes. An aged disciple, who was present on this occasion, says that Mr. Wesley took occasion to remark on the words "blessed are they who are persecuted for righteousness sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" "perhaps no man in England knows more of what this means that I do" this seconds sermon, was preached in the morning of Sunday May 7th, 1786.

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