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Powder Coating Basics

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Published on Mar 19, 2011

You can learn how to powder coat parts at home. It is a very easy process and once you learn how to do it you will want to coat everything.

Comments • 221

sbnrx7
Never, ever, let powder coating enter the intake runners of a manifold....fuel injected or not. Thermal cycles can cause adhesion failures, not just chemical (gasoline) exposure. Now an aerospace engineer has weighed in. Don't do it! Lots of powder coating experience here.  
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Allen McKinney
Good video but some important info was left out about baking. The oven to be used has to be dedicated to powder coating and can't be used for food afterwords because of chemicals from the powder coating process.
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stutteringduck
Thanks for showing us all this stuff. I've learned the more about engines from your videos than all the other stuff I've watched. How did you learn how to build engines, fabricate, body work, paint and all the rest? Did you go to school or just by doing?
Doug Beckwith
what does it look like now?
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Paul James
if thats not high temp powder its just gonna melt
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Jayj93pgt
What equipment is necessary at home to cure such powder coated items as this?  If I were to want to do wheels, I can understand the powder coating equipment, but the oven I am not sure about.  Do you have an oven to bake powder coated things in at your home?  Also, do you need to keep the ground connection on after the powder has been applied and while its baking, or could I powder coat some wheels or something and then take them somewhere to bake?
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djspock5150
Hey Pete I have cleaned parts extremely well, de-greased, coated, and baked. However sometimes i see imperfections like bubbles and fish eyes. Only method i have heard to avoid this is to warm the part or bake the part first before coating at all to get the gas bubbles out and or oil/grease you can not remove with a wire wheel, grinder, or de-greaser. I would like to know how you avoid imperfections from the process to get a smooth finish even on cast parts etc?
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Mark Alvarado
i wouldnt recommend coating those runners...but too late
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Sandman1832
Actually the part itself needs to be brought up to the temp your powder requires, for example. if super gloss clear requires a temp of 375 or lower depending on formulation, you need to bring the part itself UP TO that temp of 375 after flow out, THEN you set your timer for 20 minutes or however long the manufacturer requires. I've been an avid and professional powder coater for 7 years now and learned a lot making mistakes along the way. The reason you need to allow the part itself to come up to temperature is to allow the powder to properly adhere and cure and allow the cross link to happen. You risk for delamination to occur in the future and constant temp changes can cause it to peel from expanding and contracting.
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