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Indigenous Peoples Alto Xingu: River poisoned by soy plantations despite complaints

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Published on Aug 22, 2010

Alto Xingu's Indigenous Leader Aritana Yawalapiti, from the the upper region of indigenous territory (Park Xingu) explains the problems with soy plantations.


One of the priorities of the Alto Xingu (Upper Xingu), Indigenous leader Aritana say's that he wants to preserve most of all the watershed and spring areas of the river that enters into enormous huge indigenous peoples territory, in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The Indigenous reserve, the Xingu Park, is a green island with intact biodiversity , but finds itself surrounded by deforestation caused by ever increasing soy plantations and cattle ranches. The forest shield between soy plantations, pasture land, and the springs, watersheds and ultimately the river, are nearly not existent. Outside the borders of the Indigenous territory Xingu Park, in which inside several ethnicities of indigenous people live in a traditional way of live, agro cultural plantations and cattle mass production and enormous forest degradation created a huge impact to the original inhabitants of that area, in just a few years. Poisonous fertilizers, cattle feces and cadavers, and degraded soil from the cattle and soy production are washed into the springs, watersheds, streams and at the end rivers that enter Indigenous terrirory at the Alro Xingu. Fish, and larger animals sporadicaly die, in large amounts, in the river that enters the well preserved intact nature of the lower growing forest, cerrado, in the Alto Xingu.

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