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UW Master of Science in Clinical Informatics & Patient-Centered Technologies

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Published on Jan 6, 2015

As personalized data and ubiquitous technology drive a revolution in health care, graduates of the UW Master of Science in Clinical Informatics & Patient-Centered Technologies are well positioned to thrive in the field. Hear faculty, students and alumni talk about the strengths of this online degree program, which is designed for working professionals. Learn more at:
http://clinical-informatics.uw.edu/

Video Transcript:

[Brenda]
The number-one problem with patient safety is communication, and a lot of the communication is not done face to face; it's done through technology.

[George]
We have the opportunity to use information technology in clinical settings to improve care for patients and their families but also to use technology in the communities and in the homes, where people can become empowered to monitor their own health, store their own health information and choose when and how to share health information.

[Chris]
When I started trying to solve problems from kind of a systems approach, the answer always seemed to come up with something having to do with informatics, if not wholly on informatics. I mean, how do I make this process in clinic better or how do I make this smoother or how do I make this better for a patient?

[George]
The clinical informatics and patient-centered technologies program is a Master of Science program, and the curriculum really covers the clinical informatics aspects, such as health information systems, electronic medical records, and a lot of informatics-related concepts and principles.

[Brenda]
So the program was designed for people who are working, so professional people. And typically it's somebody from the health care field, whether it's a clinician or on the informatics side, that's interested in this topic area but doesn't want to come back and sit in a classroom five days a week.

[Janet]
The beauty of the program is the online curriculum. It just makes it so easy to work on things at your own convenience, in your own home, when it's convenient for you.

[Brenda]
Initially they come into town, they meet each other, they have an orientation and they learn a little bit about each other, to sort of build, do some team building for the cohort because they're together for the next two years.

[Chris]
I remember being a first year before starting out and seeing all the second years come back and everyone seemed to be like lifelong friends. And I was looking around and my classmates had the same opinion, "How did these people know each other so well? They've just been talking on email."

[Janet]
We learned so much from each other, from the different environments that the students had come from. It was really eye-opening to hear other people's perspectives on things, and it really made our deliverables or our finals projects much richer.

[Brenda]
We have a broad range of faculty that have hands-on experience in delivery of care as well as the development and delivery of information systems technology. So I think the students probably don't realize how lucky they are to have the type of faculty they do here.

[George]
We also place great emphasis on identifying current employment opportunities for clinical informatics professionals. Some of our students in the program want to stay in the organization they're currently working in and advance within that setting, whereas others are often thinking of a career move to explore a different setting, whether it's a different clinical setting or the industry.

[Brenda]
That's kind of our goal to find out, you know, why are you coming back to school? What do you want to do that you can't do now?

[George]
This is really an exciting time because of the advances in technology and in biomedicine and with technologies becoming part of our everyday lives, where people have embraced technology, technology's ubiquitous and pervasive, and people have learned to use technology for all aspects of their lives. So the opportunities to more effectively use such technologies for health care purposes are now more than ever before.

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