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Knowledge about autism expanding

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Published on Dec 13, 2007

More than 60 years after it was first described, autism remains one of the most puzzling childhood disorders. But in that time, much of what was believed about autism has changed dramatically, and the long-term outlook for children with autism is in many ways more hopeful than ever. While no two cases of autism are alike, studies show that many children improve with treatment.

At UCLA, and elsewhere around the country, research is ongoing to better understand the behavioral, biological, genetic and neurological basis of autism, as well as to develop appropriate treatments. "This is a really exciting time," says clinical psychologist Pegeen Cronin, Ph.D., director of the UCLA Autism Evaluation Clinic. "We have learned more about autism in the past 10 years than we knew in the previous 50."

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