Loading...

How to Make a Slingshot Gun out of household items at Home easy(DIY slingshot) Slingshot shooting

13,245 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Oct 20, 2016

How to Make a Slingshot Gun of household items (DIY slingshot) Slingshot shooting

A lot of you have been asking for a detailed tutorial on how to make a simple slingshot without power tools, so here you go!

How do you make a slingshot? My short video will show you how to make a slingshot that is both powerful and accurate. This is a DIY slingshot that is simple to make and a lot of fun to shoot! Watch the video on how to build a slingshot and then get out there and make your own slingshot! Slinh shot.

In this tutorial, we learn how to make a simple rubber-band slingshot. First, grab a strip of paper and fold it up in small folds until you reach the top of it. After you do this, fold it up to more times to get the thickest and smallest piece of paper you can get. Now, take your rubber band and place it between your thumb and pointer finger. Now, place the paper in the middle of the rubber band, then pull the rubber band back with your other hand and the paper will go into the air. Be careful with this, as it can cause injury when pointed at a person!

A slingshot or ging (primarily Australian and New Zealand), kattie (in South Africa), bean shooter, or flip or tirador (primarily Tagalog), is normally a small hand-powered projectile weapon. The classic form consists of a Y-shaped frame held in the off hand, with two natural-rubber strips attached to the uprights. The other ends of the strips lead back to a pocket that holds the projectile. The dominant hand grasps the pocket and draws it back to the desired extent to provide power for the projectile - up to a full span of the arm with sufficiently long bands.

Slingshots depend on strong elastic materials, typically vulcanized natural rubber or the equivalent, and thus date no earlier than the invention of vulcanized rubber by Charles Goodyear in 1839 (patented in 1844). By 1860, this "new engine" had already established a reputation for juvenile use in vandalism. For much of their early history, slingshots were a "do-it-yourself" item, typically made from a forked branch to form the "Y" shaped handle, with rubber strips sliced from items as inner tubes or other sources of good vulcanized rubber and firing suitably sized stones.

While early slingshots were most associated with young vandals, they were also capable hunting arms in the hands of a skilled user. Firing projectiles, such as lead musket balls, buckshot, steel ball bearings, air gun pellets, or small nails, slingshot was capable of taking game such as quail, pheasant, rabbit, dove, and squirrel. Placing multiple balls in the pouch produces a shotgun effect, such as firing a dozen BBs at a time for hunting small birds. With the addition of a suitable rest, the slingshot can also be used to fire arrows, allowing the hunting of medium-sized game at short ranges.[1][2][3]

While commercially made slingshots date from at least 1918, with the introduction of the Zip-Zip, a cast iron model,[4] it was not until the post World War II years saw a surge in the popularity, and legitimacy, of slingshots. They were still primarily a home-built proposition; a 1946 Popular Science article details a slingshot builder and hunter using home-built slingshots made from forked dogwood sticks to take small game at ranges of up to 9 m (30 ft) with No. 0 lead buckshot (8 mm [0.32 in] diameter).[5]

The Wham-O company, founded in 1948, was named after their first product, the Wham-O slingshot. It was made of ash wood and used flat rubber bands. The Wham-O was suitable for hunting with a draw weight of up to 200 newtons (45 pounds-force), and was available with an arrow rest.[1][6]

The 1940s also saw the creation of the National Slingshot Association, headquartered in San Marino, California, which organised slingshot clubs and competitions nationwide. Despite the slingshot's reputation as a tool of juvenile delinquents, the NSA reported that 80% of slingshot sales were to men over 30 years old, many of them professionals. John Milligan, a part-time manufacturer of the aluminium-framed John Milligan Special, a hunting slingshot, reported that about a third of his customers were physicians.[6]

The middle 1950s saw two major innovations in slingshot manufacture. The Wrist-Rocket was made from bent aluminium alloy rods that formed not only the handle and fork, but also a brace that extended backwards over the wrist, and provided support on the forearm to counter the torque of the bands. The Wrist-Rocket also used surgical rubber tubing rather than flat bands, attached to the backwards-facing fork ends by sliding the tubing ends over the tips of the forks, where it was held by friction or adhered with the addition of liquid rosin.[7]

Slingshots are also occasionally used in angling to disperse bait into the water over a wide area, so that multiple fish are attracted near the angler's fishing rod.

The world record for the most energetic shot with a handheld slingshot was 135 Joules.

Loading...

Advertisement
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...