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Wild Weekend In Algonquin Park

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Uploaded on May 9, 2010

Hello everyone!

It's May 8th, and I just got back from Algonquin Park. Rosebary Lake (Base Camp) for Brook, and Lake Trout. This is a hot spot in Algonquin for fishing.

It was myself, my cousin, and his German Sheppard. We crammed all of us, and at least 250 pounds or more of gear into Dave's canoe.

Knowing how the weather was not going to be great, and how things change quickly in the park. I prayed for our safety, and wisdom to stay out of danger. Before going out...

What an adventure. We started out by picking up our permit at the park office in Kearney Ontario. (Population 800) Then drove 40 minutes / kms down a road much of it dirt to access point number 2. No cell phone service in the area. We put in the canoe and paddled 5 hours (15 kilometers) to Rosebary Lake, pulling our canoe over some 5 or more beaver dams covered in stinky sticks and mud. The wind was coming out of the North West pushing us down river. (We watched a few canoes coming back against the wind having it pretty rough). The day was sunny but cool at best mixed with rain and hail at worst. At Rosebary lake we arrived approx 5 or 6 pm to setup camp, weather calm, toured the lake with the trolling rods caught nothing. Before cooking up dinner (Splake Trout my cousin caught the night before meeting me) we threw the lines in the water from shore, and the fishing started heating up. Within 20 mins we caught 4 nice sized White fish. It got dark so we had to stop.

After dinner and a long day of driving 5 hours, then paddling another 5 hours, we finally turned in. You'd think I would sleep like a log....

I brought my winter sleeping bag, was still cold, and woke up at least 20 times. The wind switched to North East, and brought in below zero tempratures. At daybreak I woke my cousin up with an aweful feeling of dread or death. We need to cut this short, and get out of here now. We packed it up, paddled 5 hours (15 kms) back up the Tim River, and foiled with the idea of staying at Tim Lake as our Retreat Camp.

Figuring it's only a short canoe back to the Truck, we setup camp on Tim's.... (Situated on the eastern shore, well sheltered with lots of trees, complete with Bear Skat).

Next morning we woke up to snow, and cold tempratures. (On a funny note I sang Jingle Bells to the top of my lungs to the whole lake) The fish weren't biting. Wet; cold, and defeated we packed it all up, and ended the trip a day early. On the way home, I drove through a blizzard of blowing snow with low visibility. The wind was pushing my vehicle into the road.

Here's where it gets interesting. There were people heading into Rosebary Lake despite us warning them of the conditions on the way out. In and outside the park. I think these people are underestimated the weather, and I did advise the park people.

The weather itself isn't bad if your just outside for a walk. But in a canoe/tent wet, and fatigued this has major potential for hypothermia. Thus being far away from help. Spells a recipe for disaster.

The park people said they recently brought someone out who drowned to death, and do have to evacuate people for hypothermia at times. I'd say this has a high possibility of being one of those times. Tommorow (Sunday) will be the same temprature in the morning without snow, and only heating up to 5 degrees. ( with 20 kms hour winds coming from the North West), which means paddling upstream would be very difficult.

News reports monday stated the weather in another part of Southern Ontario claimed the life of at least one canoeist who wasn't wearing a life jacket.

Praise God for getting me home safe.

JJ (Gospel Fisherman)

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