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TWO OBJECTS AT LOW ALTITUDE: Northern Ontario, September 16, 2012

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Published on Sep 20, 2012

Two unexplained objects were observed at very low altitude at my location on the morning of September 16, 2012. While one was somewhat stationary, a second object flew at a very slow speed and very low altitude from north to south without making a sound. I estimate the objects were approximately 600 yards away from me--across the bay and directly over the start of the tree line. STRONG LANGUAGE WARNING.

I challenge any serious and reputable researcher or expert to analyze this footage, submit me to any type of lie-detection method available or do whatever else is necessary to authenticate the truthful, honest and accurate nature of this video presentation.

Information on aircraft navigation lighting courtesy Youtube channel "skyfoxcd1"...

The external lights on aircraft fall into two general categories. The first is navigation lights or beacons that are always illuminated while the aircraft is in operation. A second type includes takeoff and landing lights that are used to improve visibility when the plane is close to or on the ground. Several of these lights are discussed in greater detail below.

Navigation lights: All aircraft are equipped with a steady light near the leading edge of each wingtip. When facing forward from the perspective of the pilot, the light on the right wingtip is green while that on the left wing is red. The different colors make it possible for an outside observer, such as the pilot of another aircraft, to determine which direction the plane is flying. These navigation lights are most useful at night when it is more difficult to tell the direction the plane is going without them.

Logo lights: These lights are not required but are common on most commercial aircraft. The lights are usually located on the surface of or at the tips of the horizontal stabilizer. The steady white lights are used to illuminate the company's logo painted on the vertical tail. While useful for advertising, the primary purpose of these lights is safety since the bright lights help to make the plane more visible.

Strobe lights: High-intensity strobe lights that flash a white-colored light are located on each wingtip. Most smaller planes are only equipped with one of these strobes near the leading edge just behind the red or green navigation light. Larger airliners may be equipped with an additional strobe at the trailing edge as well. These flashing lights are very bright and intended to attract attention during flight. They are sometimes also used on the runway and during taxi to make the plane more conspicuous.

Anti-Collision Beacon lights: Two beacon lights are fitted to aircraft near the center of the fuselage. One is located on top of the fuselage and the other on the bottom. These lights are colored reddish orange and rotate to produce a flashing effect. The beacons are turned on just before the engines are started and they remain active until the last engine is shut down. The beacons help to serve as a safety warning to ground personnel that the engines are operational

Navigation or Position lights: In addition to the red and green lights, most planes are also fitted with other steady white navigation lights in various locations. Large airliners, in particular, will often have such lighting on the trailing edge of each wingtip. These lights are also sometimes placed along the trailing edges of the horizontal tail. Another popular location is at the very aft end of the fuselage or at the top of the vertical tail. One of these latter lights placed along the aircraft center line is especially common on smaller airliners and commuter planes. Whatever the location, the purpose of these steady white lights is to improve the plane's visibility from behind the aircraft.

Wing lights: Many airliners feature lights along the root of the wing leading edge that can be used to illuminate the wing and engine pylons in flight. These lights may be used to make the plane more visible during takeoff and landing or to inspect the wings for damage in flight. Pilots can also use the wing lights to inspect the wings and slats for any ice accretion that might build up when flying through clouds.

All material in this video is Copyrighted by William L. Smith aka PLANETunderATTACK 2012 with all rights reserved.

As always, please comment with your polite and insightful opinions.

Please check out this site...
http://ufoinvestigations.org/

For more information about me and my background, see this link...
http://ufoinvestigations.org/about-us...

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