Loading...

Dell Precision 220 Workstation/Multiprocessor Computing Fun!

45,492 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Jul 11, 2011

Here's my effort to beat the Keykeeper's longest video. I think I pulled it off! (Sibling rivalry? _What_ sibling rivalry? ;-))

This Dell workstation uses the Intel i820 chipset. It was also undoubtedly very expensive when new. Unlike any other Dell computer I have ever seen, this uses standard temperature, fan and power supply voltage sensors from National Semiconductor, Analog Devices and Maxim Integrated Products as opposed to the proprietary and mostly undocumented Dell/SMsC sensor implementation. SpeedFan can access some of these sensors and they do return reasonable values, although fan speed control is not supported. Dell actually mentions these sensors in the promotional literature for this computer.

I know this is something of a rambling video and hope that you'll forgive me if it bothers you. I wouldn't bet my life that the multiprocessing explanation and timeline are 100% perfect--gentle corrections would be welcome--but I think it's a serviceable explanation for the layperson.

Although almost every computer sold today will have a multiple core CPU, multi-processor computing used to require two or more physical CPUs as well as a motherboard made to handle such things. As such, multiprocessor capable systems were typically very expensive and reserved for those who could justify their expense. So, while this computer isn't something I'd consider a true "antique" system, it is an interesting look back at how things "used to be done" and what used to be a niche market. Computers made with multiple physical processor sockets do still exist--the Mac Pro and discontinued Xserve sold by Apple would be well known (though certainly not the only) examples. They are used when the number of cores available in a single CPU are not sufficient for a given computing task.

Multiprocessor computing is also not limited to the x86 world. Multiple processor systems have been developed for all popular processor architectures. There are also auxiliary processor cards that are used to run totally different operating systems. My IBM 6152 Academic System is an example of such a "multiprocessor" configuration.

I might have been a year early on this system's production date--it may have been shipped in June of 2001 as opposed to June 2000.

Loading...

Advertisement
to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...