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Robert L. Kelly at Saturday U: Wyoming's Bighorn Basin: Climate and Human Population Change

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Published on Dec 4, 2011

Wyoming's Bighorn Basin: 14,000 Years of Climate and Human Population Change," Robert L. Kelly, Frison Institute director and Department of Anthropology professor. We can now reconstruct changes in the size of human populations, accurately over thousands of years, with a new method developed by UW faculty members. Combined with new UW research into past climate change, we can also examine, more precisely than ever before, the relationships between human population size and climate change. Find out what these new insights from Wyoming's Bighorn Basin could mean for the Rocky Mountain region.
A past president of the Society for American Archaeology and past secretary of the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association, Kelly has written more than 100 articles, books, and reviews. Since 1973 he has worked on the archaeology, ethnology and ethnography of foraging peoples, conducting archaeological research in the western United States and ethnographic work in Madagascar. He is now researching caves and rock shelters in Wyoming's Big Horn Basin, and studying the archaeology of ice patches in Glacier National Park.


Early human life in Wyoming and a new take on Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde were among topics Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011 for the fall term of Saturday U -- the University of Wyoming's free one-day college education program.
A half-day of college classes and discussion began with refreshments at the National Museum of Wildlife Art Cook Auditorium in Jackson, WY.
Three representatives from UW presented lectures, followed with a free lunch and a question and answer session.
Saturday U is a collaborative program that connects popular UW professors with life-long learners in Jackson Hole. Offered three times a year, Saturday U is sponsored by the university, the UW Foundation and Wyoming Humanities Council and presented by Central Wyoming College (CWC), the National Museum of Wildlife Art and Teton County Library Foundation.
For more information about Saturday U, visit the website at http://www.uwyo.edu/SaturdayU/ or contact Teton County Library Adult Humanities Coordinator Oona Doherty at 733-2164 ext. 135 or email odoherty@tclib.org .
Video by UW Television, Outreach Technology Services
Camera/Editor: Ali Grossman
Copyright 2011 UW Television

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