Loading...

HGL 025 Lymphsystem - SD PAL / HGL 025 lymphatic system - SD PAL

34,274 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Feb 2, 2011

Kategorie C - Liegt zur Lizenzierung ohne Wasserzeichen in folgendem Format vor: 720x576.
Die Einbettung mit Wasserzeichen ist kostenlos


English: Category C -
full version without watermark 720x576 (check terms and conditions at www.teledesign.de)
The embed version with watermark is free of charge. -

Description: How is the lymphatic system composed, how does it work? The system consists of very tiny collection sites for the lymphatic fluid that are distributed all over the body like a network of roots. The lymphatic system is no circulation like the blood vascular system. It is designed to collect the lymph from all parts of the body. The vessels -- which can be thought of as minute pipelines -- run together, getting larger and larger. In the middle of the upper part of the body runs the largest lymphatic vessel: the thoracic duct. It is there that all vessels converge. It feeds the lymph into the left angulus venosus towards the heart. A great number of valves prevent the lymph from flowing in the wrong direction. A particularity of lymph vessels is that they transport the lymphatic fluid with an own thin layer of smooth muscles. They hence pump the lymph like little hearts in one direction -- that is towards the heart. The lymph nodes are responsible for purification. They filter out troublesome material like germs, viruses and metabolic waste products.
How is lymph formed? Blood fluid is pressed from the arteries into the tissue as interstitial fluid which nourishes the cells. About 90% of this interstitial fluid is then again taken up by the veins. The remaining 10% are called the "lymph obligatory load" and are removed via the lymphatic system. It amounts to about 2 liters per day for an average adult. Transport of the lymph is controlled by simple physical mechanisms. Filtration and resorption of the lymph are regulated by pressure gradients within the tissue and the vessel. The lymphatic vessels react to high transportation need with increased beating frequency of the valves. If required they can more than double their working speed.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...