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Traditional music of the Tsuur

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Uploaded on Sep 27, 2009

UNESCO: Urgent Safeguarding List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity - 2009
URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/USL...
Description: Tsuur music is based on a combination of instrumental and vocal performance a blending of sounds created simultaneously by both the musical instrument and the human throat. Tsuur music has an inseparable connection to the Uriankhai Mongolians of the Altai Region, and remains an integral part of their daily life. Its origins lie in an ancient practice of worshipping nature and its guardian spirits by emulating natural sounds. The Tsuur is a vertical pipe-shaped wooden wind instrument with three fingerholes. Simultaneously touching the mouthpiece of the pipe with ones front teeth and applying ones throat produces a unique timbre comprising a clear and gentle whistling sound and a drone. The Tsuur is traditionally played to ensure success for hunts, for benign weather, as a benediction for safe journeys or for weddings and other festivities. The music reflects ones inner feelings when travelling alone, connects a human to nature, and serves as a performing art. The Tsuur tradition has faded over recent decades as a consequence of negligence and animosity toward folk customs and religious faith, leaving many locales with no Tsuur performer and no families possessing a Tsuur. The forty known pieces preserved among the Uriankhai Mongolians are transmitted exclusively through the memory of successive generations a feature making this art highly vulnerable to the risk of disappearing.
Country(ies): Mongolia
© 2009 by National Centre for the Intangible Cultural Heritage

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