Loading...

Total Lunar Eclipse

350,364 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Mar 5, 2014

A total lunar eclipse will take place on April 15, 2014, the first of two total lunar eclipses in 2014.

In 2014, there are two solar eclipses and two total lunar eclipses as follows.

2014 Apr 15: Total Lunar Eclipse
2014 Apr 29: Annular Solar Eclipse
2014 Oct 08: Total Lunar Eclipse
2014 Oct 23: Partial Solar Eclipse

The first eclipse of the year is well placed for observers throughout the Western Hemisphere. The eclipse occurs at the lunar orbit's ascending node in Virgo. The apparent diameter of the Moon is close to its average since the eclipse occurs nearly midway between apogee (April 08 at 14:53 UT) and perigee (April 23 at 00:28 UT). This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015

The Moon's orbital trajectory takes it through the southern half of Earth's umbral shadow. Although the eclipse is not central, the total phase still lasts 78 minutes. T

The entire event is visible from both North and South America. Observers in the western Pacific miss the first half of the eclipse because it occurs before moonrise. Likewise most of Europe and Africa experience moonset just as the eclipse begins. None of the eclipse is visible from north/east Europe, eastern Africa, the Middle East or Central Asia.

Credits: NASA
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH201...

Astronomy Senior Editor and veteran eclipse watcher Richard Talcott notes how safe this event is to watch. "A lunar eclipse poses no danger whatsoever to your eyes," he says. "All you're looking at is the Moon passing through a big shadow. Not only do you not need any filters, but you also can feel free to magnify the sight by using binoculars or a telescope."

http://www.astronomy.com/observing/sk...

All times and dates used in this publication are in Universal Time or UT. This astronomically derived time system is colloquially referred to as Greenwich Mean Time or GMT. To learn more about UT and how to convert UT to your own local time, see Time Zones and Universal Time.http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/T...

Music credits: Gotta Find Out
YouTube Audio Library

Loading...


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...