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Iris Recognition by Prof. John Daugman

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Published on Nov 12, 2015

Iris Recognition by Prof. John Daugman

This video was recorded at IntelliSys 2015 - http://saiconference.com/IntelliSys

Talk Title: Biometrics on a Continental Scale: Automatic Identification of Persons by their Iris Patterns
Abstract: Technologies for reliable automatic identification of persons by their biometric traits have advanced greatly in the past two decades, in modalities, algorithms, architectures, and international standards. Several national-scale biometric deployments have been launched, most notably the Unique Identification Authority of India which now is 75% finished in enrolling the biometric traits (iris patterns and fingerprints) of the entire population of 1.2 billion citizens over three years. Its purposes are to ensure fair access to government services and entitlements, to reduce welfare fraud, and to enhance social inclusion, under the slogan: "To Give the Poor an Identity." This talk will discuss the technologies behind biometric identification on such a continental scale using iris recognition, especially the mathematics underlying high speed matching and the avoidance of collisions (False Matches) when so many opportunities arise since all persons are cross-compared with all others for de-duplication checks. This ambitious program enrolls a million people every day, across 36,000 stations run by 83 agencies, performing 900 trillion (900 million-million) iris cross-comparisons daily. The speaker will explain how his algorithms achieve the tremendous match speed required, and how the critical avoidance of identity collisions (False Matches) is accomplished through the key statistics of encoded pattern entropy.

About the Speaker: John Daugman received his degrees at Harvard University and then taught at Harvard before coming to Cambridge University, where he is Professor of Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition. He has also held the Johann Bernoulli Chair of Mathematics and Informatics at the University of Groningen, and the Toshiba Endowed Chair at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. His areas of research and teaching at Cambridge include computer vision, information theory, neural computing and statistical pattern recognition. Awards for his work in science and technology include the Information Technology Award and Medal of the British Computer Society, the "Time 100" Innovators Award, and the OBE, Order of the British Empire. He has been elected to Fellowships of: the Royal Academy of Engineering; the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications; and the British Computer Society. Recently he was inducted permanently into the US National Inventors Hall of Fame.

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