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Fighting Poverty With Innovation: Nishant Lalwani at TEDxFulbright

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Published on Jul 22, 2012

Fulbright Nishant Lalwani gives talk, "Fighting Poverty With Innovation: The Power of Social Enterprise". This presentation was given at the TEDx Fulbright event held at the British Consulate in Cambridge, MA April 24, 2012.

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Comments • 10

WarmongerWW3
Prove me wrong. 
Walter Kurtz
I think i'll just watch the video
tincey2001
There is no logic in your argument. Only self-serving B.S. 
WarmongerWW3
The life-style and consumption patterns of the people in the First World countries are beyond what the Earth can support, and 80% of the world's natural resources are consumed by about 17% of the world's people (UN Food and Agriculture Association - State of Food Insecurity 2003). We must not allow poor nations to develop because they would become like us and consume too much. My conclusion is pure logic.
GamerFromJump
Any future readers are going to want to read from bottom to top for this to make any sense.
GamerFromJump
(cont'd) The simple fact of the matter is that the developing world is not simply going to up and die for you, and the current situation is untenable, so we ought to be doing what's possible to eliminate it. Preferably not by paternalistic "aid", but by, as the speaker stated, enforcing the things that allowed the First World to develop, such as property rights and reduction of corruption in public institutions. Your "conclusion" is frankly grotesque and sociopathic. 
GamerFromJump
(con't) by comparison to someplace in America, Canada, Europe, Japan, etc. Also, advanced societies, and the technology they create, get more mileage out of a given resource unit than impoverished societies. The development of the First World has allowed more people to unleash their creative ability than ever before. By raising everyone up, we allow more creative people to live long enough to create, which creates a positive feedback that increases world resource efficiency.
GamerFromJump
*That* is the worst thing *I've* heard in a long time. For one thing, "poverty" and "poor" are different things, with the former being "not having enough to meet basic needs" while "poor" simply means "at the back of the money curve". The idea that "the system" *needs* some people to be in poverty is bull. Also, purely numerical "consumption" says nothing about what a society *produces*. It also ignores innovation that makes advanced economies run cleaner per capita. Take a look at the Ganges.
WarmongerWW3
That's the worst thing I've heard in a long time. The system does not work without poverty. According to the Worldwatch Institute if developing countries were to consume as much resources per capita as United States or Japan in 2030 together they would require a full planet Earth to meet their needs. Conclusion: we need to keep them poor and promote depopulation. 
GamerFromJump
Don't forget that to aid people, you must avoid or eliminate the ones whose power base relies on the continuation of the situation that you came to help with in the first place.
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