JP

Loading...

You're viewing YouTube in English (US).
Switch to another language: | View all
You're viewing YouTube in English.
Switch to another language: | View all

Major Norman Hatch, USMC (Ret.)

16,614 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Oct 15, 2007

As a combat cameraman, Hatch has a very different perspective of the war though the lens of his camera, as he begins, "I was living in the movie, I was disassociated with everything that was going on around me." Hatch risks his life to document the brutal battle on Tarawa island as the Marines assault the beach head and take the island. Because a cameraman's combat stance is upright, "it is like having a target on your back." Hatch's footage is riveting and he captures on film the first and only time in the Pacific war in which both the enemy and our troops are in the same frame of film, fighting against each other. Viewers will see this historic footage as several Japanese soldiers run across the screen with our Marines firing at them. Another historic aspect of his footage was showing war casualties to the general public for the first time, as Hatch describes it, "up close and dirty". The film won an Academy Award for outstanding documentary short subject in 1944.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...