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How To Flush & Clean an Atwood RV Water Heater

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Uploaded on Sep 1, 2011

You can find our water heater tank rinsing wand on Amazon:
http://tinyurl.com/kd37urs

UPDATE - April 3, 2012: Regarding our use of an after-market anode rod. There are questions about which metal to use - magnesium, aluminum or zinc. As we mentioned in the video, we only chose this particular anode due to the extreme difficulty we had removing the original, despite the fact that it is a different material than the original rod. We've now inspected it after a year and are not happy that it did not decay as expected this year (did not decay at all), and are concerned it isn't protecting the tank properly. After hearing from two friends who also have Suburban units, who removed their anodes without much trouble, we're going back to the OEM rod with no drain, and will be updating the video when we do.

UPDATE — Sept 22, 2013: UPDATE! THE ANODE ROD VERDICT IS IN! SEE IT HERE:
http://youtu.be/tcxHIFKLVbc

We demonstrate how to thoroughly flush and clean an RV water heater.

Rust, lime scale and other debris can build up in the hot water tank on your motorhome, travel trailer or 5th wheel. Left alone, this can shorten the useful life of your water heater. Simple annual maintenance and care of your RV's hot water system will save you money by extending the life of the heater.

We recently flushed the Suburban water heater on our Newmar, so rather than do it again, we've borrowed our friends' Atwood water heater to demonstrate how to do it.

Only a few simple items are required, including a wrench to remove the drain plug or anode rod, a tank flush wand, and some white vinegar (1/2 gallon for every gallon of tank capacity). If you have a Suburban brand water heater, be sure to have a new replacement anode rod on hand as well (magnesium, aluminum or zinc/aluminum).

The small amount of time required to do this simple but essential maintenance will pay for itself with years of extra service from your RV's hot water heater.

To hear about new videos, giveaways and other great RVing content as soon as it's released, visit our website and subscribe!
http://TheRVgeeks.com

The intro music is my own piano performance of Scott Joplin's Maple Leaf Rag from 1899.

Full-Time RVers since April 11, 2003, we share DIY (do it yourself) RV maintenance, repair, travel, upgrade and operational tips & tricks.

While we're not RV technicians, we're very mechanically inclined and have learned a lot about RV systems over the years. We've handled most of our own minor service, maintenance and upgrade work on both of our RVs.

We meet lots of newer RVers who are eager to learn some basics about using, maintaining and caring for their rigs. After more than a decade on the road, we're happy to share what we've learned (some of it the hard way). ;-) We hope our experience can help other RVers go DIY, saving time & money while experiencing the satisfaction of a job well done.

We are not professional RV technicians and do not pretend to be experts on any particular topic. We mostly know about maintaining our own motorhome, so be sure to confirm that all methods and materials used are compatible with your equipment. Every RV is different, so your systems may not be the same as ours. Regardless of what we recommend, consult a professional if you're unsure about working on your RV. We encourage you to do your own research. Any task you perform or product you purchase based on any information we provide is strictly at your own risk.

Comments welcome! Thanks for watching! Don't forget to subscribe!

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