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'The Limonaire 1900' Play's "Entry of the Gladiators"

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Published on Jan 7, 2013

"Entrance of the Gladiators" or "Entry of the Gladiators" (Czech: Vjezd gladiátorů, German: Einzug der Gladiatoren) is a military march composed in 1897 by the Czech composer Julius Fučík. He originally titled it "Grande Marche Chromatique," reflecting the use of chromatic scales throughout the piece, but changed the title based on his personal interest in the Roman Empire.
In 1910 Canadian composer Louis-Philippe Laurendeau arranged "Entrance of the Gladiators" for a small band under the title "Thunder and Blazes", and sold this version throughout North America. It was during this period that the song gained lasting popularity as a screamer march for circuses, often used to introduce clowns. Today it is known mainly by this association, even though the title and composer are relatively obscure. Laurendeau's version was also transcribed for fairground organs. The march receives the occasional concert hall performance, such as at the 2007 Last Night of The Proms.
This organ playing is now in the 'Hall of Halls' (Moegi Village Museum) Japan http://www.moeginomura.co.jp/hall.html and has been expertly restored. All the original books of music were transcribed by Arthur Prinsen. The organ was built by the Limonaire brothers in 1900, being very special, and costing twice as much as their normal organs, only this one was ever made and became their showpiece, winning gold medals at the Paris worlds fair 1900 and the Brussels worlds fair in 1905. It was later bought by Belgian showman Gustave Reynard, when in 1914 world war one broke out Mr. Reynard put the Limonaire behind a wall in his workshop for safe keeping, in 1918 on armistice day Mr. Reynard broke down the wall to reveal his Limonaire in perfect playing condition where it then played the the first post war Belgian national anthem. When the second world war broke out the organ was being used in Albert Reynards (Gustavs son) Lilliput train children's ride at fairs, during the war the organ never played so when the war was over the Limonaire was in a poor state, just before he died Albert sold the ride and organ, but the new owners showed no interest in the Limonaire which was laid aside discarded for 20 years. Then in 1965 Raymond Bovy (a cousin of Albert Reynard) of Chenee, near Liege Belgium, heard about the organ and was able to purchased it, he then set about rebuilding and restoring it when on August the 11th: that year after 700 hours work the Limonaire played again.(©T.G)

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