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Smetana - Ma Vlast - Mvt 1a - Vyšehrad - My Fatherland - Second Queensland Youth Orchestra QYO2

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Published on Jul 3, 2010

Movement 1a of "Ma Vlast", My Fatherland, by Bedřich Smetana, named "Vyšehrad". QYO2, Second Queensland Youth Orchestra conducted by Sergei V Korschmin is performing this beautiful symphonic poem while on tour in Sydney. Live footage in HD with Dolby Stereo Sound.

These talented musicians, 13 to 23 years of age, are performing at a lunchtime concert in Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music on 27 June 2010. All the players are members of the Second Queensland Youth Orchestra, a full symphony orchestra based in Brisbane, Australia. http://qyo.org.au

Here are the links for the entire concert:

Mvt 1a http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/40/...
Mvt 1b http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/41/...
Mvt 2a http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/42/...
Mvt 2b http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/43/...
Mvt3 http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/44/...
Mvt 4a http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/45/...
Mvt 4b http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/46/...
Mvt 5a http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/47/...
Mvt 5b http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/48/...
Mvt 6a http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/49/...
Mvt 6b http://www.youtube.com/A1okEZ#p/u/50/...


Má Vlast is a set of six symphonic poems composed between 1874 and 1879 by the Czech composer Bedřich Smetana. While it is often presented as a single work in six movements, the individual pieces were conceived as a set of individual works.

This, the first poem, Vyšehrad (The High Castle), premiered on 14 March 1875. It describes the Vyšehrad castle in Prague which was the seat of the earliest Czech kings.

It was written during the summer of 1874 when Bedřich Smetana began to go deaf. He woke on the morning of 20 October to find himself completely unable to hear anything. The previous night he had gone to the opera with some hearing still remaining.

The poem begins with the sounds of the harp of the singer Lumír, and then crosses over into the tones of the castle's arsenal. This section of the music introduces the main motifs, which are used in other parts of the cycle. A four note motif (B♭-E♭-D-B♭) represents the castle of Vyšehrad; this is heard again at the end of 'Vltava' and once more, to round the whole cycle off, at the conclusion of 'Blanik'.

In the score two harps are required to perform the opening arpeggios. After a dominant seventh chord, the winds take up the theme, followed by the strings, before the whole orchestra is employed to reach a climax. In the next part, Smetana recalls the story of the castle, using a faster tempo which becomes a march. A seemingly triumphant climax is cut short by a descending passage depicting the collapse of the castle, and the music falls quiet. Then the opening harp material is heard again and the music reminds again of the beauty of the castle, now in ruins. The music ends quietly, depicting the River Vltava flowing below the castle.

Conceived between 1872 and 1874, it is the only piece in the cycle to be mostly completed before Smetana began to go noticeably deaf in the summer of 1874. Most performances last approximately fifteen minutes in duration.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Má_vlast

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